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PAGE 16A HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 2014 At inaugural conference of Israeli-American group, a sense of tentativeness Shahar Azran Israeli American Council founder and chairman Shawn Evenhaim and actress Noa Tishby at the council's first national meeting in Washington, D.C., Nov. 7, 2014. addressed," said Rabbi Levi Shemtov, who heads Washing- ton, D.C.'s Chabad office and led the Friday night kiddush. Some 600,000 Israelis live in the United States, accord- ing to the IAC, which now has six chapters across the country. U.S. Census figures, which count only American citizens, report about 100,000 Americans born in Israel. The conference drew over 750 participants from 23 states. Shula Bahat, who promotes the Israeli museum Beth Hatfutsot-The Museum of the Jewish People in the United States, said the community has come a long way since her arrival in 1973. In those days, Israelis back home tended to view them as having aban- doned the country--Yitzhak Rabin, then a hero of the 1967 Six Day War, called them "lowlifes"--and American Jews didn't know what to make of them. Since then, as Israel has integrated fully into the global economy, necessitating stud- ies abroad and careers over- the American Jewish com- munity. "Israeli Americans--No Longer Bystanders?" was the title of one session. "Israeli- American Double Identity: Comfortvs.Conscience?"was another. Sessions frequently became emotive confessionals that ad- dressed an array of obstacles to Israeli assimilation into the American Jewish commu- nity-among them a distaste for community life formed around a house of worship, the liberal political leanings of U.S. Jews and a lack of Israeli familiarity with fundraising. At times, the conference seemed to veer into psycho- drama. "Our two homelands are like mother and father, we want them to love one an- other," said the narrator of a slideshow that included animations of falafel and Israeli flags. "I think a certain regret- table loneliness among many Israelis living here longer than they anticipated is being By Ron Kampeas WASHINGTON (JTA)-- There were bagel breakfasts, a Friday night kiddush in Eng- lish and Hebrew, and plenty of talk about how to keep the grandkids Jewish. In some ways, the inaugural conference last weekend of the Israeli American Council was much like other Jewish gatherings, except the Jews were Israelis and a lot of what makes Jewish America what it is remains alien to them--for instance, bagels, bilingual blessings and fears of assimilation. "We need to know each other better," said the IAC's chairman, Shawn Evenhaim, pronouncing what might have been the conference theme. A sense of tentativeness pervaded the conference, the first since the IAC was founded in LosAngeles seven years ago. Last year, the organization began opening chapters across the country. The conference is part of its bid to integrate Israelis into Information 866.74006655 www.c00ce.org Cornerstone is committed to caring for all hospice patients regardless of payer source or ability to pay. 100% Covered by Medicare & Medicaid seas, the stigma has receded, she said. "Every Israeli family has a member of the family who lives elsewhere now," Bahat said. That has stirred a longing to become involved, but there have been obstacles. At a session on the role of Israeli-Americans in the U.S. Jewish community, Gil Pre- uss described how Israelis in Boston wanted a more robust show of support for Israel's recent war against Hamas than the broader community was prepared to offer. "They had a particular strategy," Preuss said. "We thought that strategy was wrong." Israelis also resist Ameri- can Jewish traditions, con- ferencegoers said, particularly the tendency to center life around the synagogue. "For Israelis, synagogues do not have a good connotation," said Sarit Ron, who directs Chofshi b'Manhattan, an Is- raeli outreach initiative of the Stephen Wise Free Synagogue on New York's Upper West Side. "Their attitude is you're going to try and convert me." Ron said she has managed to build a community at the synagogue by peddling a low-key approach, emphasiz- ing the range of activities, including concerts by Israeli performers. Another draw has been sessions for children focusing on Israeli song and dance--a response to paren- tal anxieties about the loss of Israeli culture in the next generation. This was a repeated theme at the conference, with Israelis voicing concerns about their kids losing both their Israeli and Jewish identities. Shmuel Rosner, the Israeli journalist who blogs about theAmerican Jewish community and who appeared on a number of pan- els, enjoyed asking Israelis in the audience why they wanted to remain Jewish at all. "It doesn't matter if I want to forget I am Jewish," one older man said. "There will be somebody there to remind me." Another obstacle is the lack of Israeli familiarity with fun- draising for charitable causes, even those that fulfill their own needs. Rachel Davidson, a former New Jersey judge now on the IAC board, said social pressure was an avenue to getting Israelis to give. "Making being philan- thropic the price for social acceptance can be very effec- tive," Davidson said. With Israeli-American now referring to the children of Israelis, some of whom no longer speak fluent Hebrew, activists also faced a dilemma of when to switch content to English. On the confer- ence's last day, a young man approached Benhaim as he passed breakfast tables laden with bagels. "Ani rotzeh lehagid," the man said, using American- accented Hebrew for "I want to say." Then he paused and finished in English: "This was amazing." Hadassah's hospitals treat victims and terrorists the same By Barbara Sorer A first-hand account of a scene at the hospital. Outside the Swartz Cen- ter for Emergency Medicine at Hadassah's hospitals, TV cameramen are waiting for the blinking lights and sirens of the ambulance. One of the injured is already inside-- a young man who had been stabbed by a ter- rorist. The terrorist, allegedly as- sociated with Islamic jihad, had driven his vehicle into a bus stop, running over 26-year-old Dalia Lemkus. When his minivan hit an J + 00'-'omcrstonc H O S P I C E 5019096 obstruction, he jumped out and began stabbing her and others. A security guard from nearbyAlon Shvut shot him. The terrorist ran away after being shot, but the guard pursued him and shot him again. He will be coming in the second ambulance. The ambulance parks near the entrance of the CEM. Medics hurry around the back and carry a swarthy, bloodied man on a stretcher into the trauma center. "The terrorist," whispers a woman in the waiting room near ambulatory care. "It must be the terrorist." Heavily armed soldiers and police follow the stretch- er. Doctors, nurses, auxiliary staff, soldiers and police crowd into the trauma room. I'm there too, watching. The scene felt eerily familiar. Prominent Trauma Surgeon Avi Rivkind, internationally recognized for handling ter- ror treatment, will be orches- trating the care. In a sky blue shirt, Rivkind is in charge, quietly asking questions, looking for good answers, giving orders. The trauma unit was built in the wake of the Second Intifada, from 2000-2005, when half of the terror victims in the country were treated in Hadassah's hospitals. The terrorist is placed in the far left bay; the man he'd stabbed is to the right. How many times have I explained that we treat Jew and Arab, even terror victim and ter- rorist the same? The terror victim needs a CAT scan. The terrorist, identified as Maher Hadi a-Hashalmoun from He- bron, might have a bullet in his heart. The imaging technicians and the cardio- thoracic surgeon are sum- moned. A senior orthopedic surgeon stands by. A group of physicians hover over the computer to interpret the tests. Will the terrorist need heart surgery? The hospital director phones in a request to have operating room number eight readied. Just in case. The terror wctim's stab wounds are evaluated. One of the doctors says the first CAT scan is different from the second. They need to wait and see what develops. His family has arrived. The specialists who were supposed to be doing later- afternoon clinics ask for phone calls to be made to cancel their patients. This will take a while. There is news of another possible stabbing and an injury from a stoning. The empty bays of the trauma center don't need to be read- ied. They are always ready. 18 physicians-- among them Hadassah's most ex- perienced- stand around the terrorist. The cardiotho- racic surgeon reads the test results. No heart surgery needed. The bullet isn't in the heart. The surgeon orders an angiogram. The terrorist is wheeled out. The specialists begin to leave. The news reports that Dalia Lemkus, 26, died of her wounds at the site. The TV cameras have moved to the atrium of the Sarah Wetsman Davidson Tower. It's too cold and dark outside. Deputy Director Dr. Ashi Salmon is speaking before TV cameras. Channel 2, Channel 1, Channel 10. Patients from three other at- tacks are still at the hospital, he tells them. Patients are waiting for care at the ER walk-in service. Some are wearing kefiyyas, others streimels. Some are bare-headed. They are treated the same: Arab and Jew, religious and secu- lar, and even terror victim and terrorist. The same, the same, the same. PAGE 16A HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 2014 At inaugural conference of Israeli-American group, a sense of tentativeness Shahar Azran Israeli American Council founder and chairman Shawn Evenhaim and actress Noa Tishby at the council's first national meeting in Washington, D.C., Nov. 7, 2014. addressed," said Rabbi Levi Shemtov, who heads Washing- ton, D.C.'s Chabad office and led the Friday night kiddush. Some 600,000 Israelis live in the United States, accord- ing to the IAC, which now has six chapters across the country. U.S. Census figures, which count only American citizens, report about 100,000 Americans born in Israel. The conference drew over 750 participants from 23 states. Shula Bahat, who promotes the Israeli museum Beth Hatfutsot-The Museum of the Jewish People in the United States, said the community has come a long way since her arrival in 1973. In those days, Israelis back home tended to view them as having aban- doned the country--Yitzhak Rabin, then a hero of the 1967 Six Day War, called them "lowlifes"--and American Jews didn't know what to make of them. Since then, as Israel has integrated fully into the global economy, necessitating stud- ies abroad and careers over- the American Jewish com- munity. "Israeli Americans--No Longer Bystanders?" was the title of one session. "Israeli- American Double Identity: Comfortvs.Conscience?"was another. Sessions frequently became emotive confessionals that ad- dressed an array of obstacles to Israeli assimilation into the American Jewish commu- nity-among them a distaste for community life formed around a house of worship, the liberal political leanings of U.S. Jews and a lack of Israeli familiarity with fundraising. At times, the conference seemed to veer into psycho- drama. "Our two homelands are like mother and father, we want them to love one an- other," said the narrator of a slideshow that included animations of falafel and Israeli flags. "I think a certain regret- table loneliness among many Israelis living here longer than they anticipated is being By Ron Kampeas WASHINGTON (JTA)-- There were bagel breakfasts, a Friday night kiddush in Eng- lish and Hebrew, and plenty of talk about how to keep the grandkids Jewish. In some ways, the inaugural conference last weekend of the Israeli American Council was much like other Jewish gatherings, except the Jews were Israelis and a lot of what makes Jewish America what it is remains alien to them--for instance, bagels, bilingual blessings and fears of assimilation. "We need to know each other better," said the IAC's chairman, Shawn Evenhaim, pronouncing what might have been the conference theme. A sense of tentativeness pervaded the conference, the first since the IAC was founded in LosAngeles seven years ago. Last year, the organization began opening chapters across the country. The conference is part of its bid to integrate Israelis into Information 866.74006655 www.c00ce.org Cornerstone is committed to caring for all hospice patients regardless of payer source or ability to pay. 100% Covered by Medicare & Medicaid seas, the stigma has receded, she said. "Every Israeli family has a member of the family who lives elsewhere now," Bahat said. That has stirred a longing to become involved, but there have been obstacles. At a session on the role of Israeli-Americans in the U.S. Jewish community, Gil Pre- uss described how Israelis in Boston wanted a more robust show of support for Israel's recent war against Hamas than the broader community was prepared to offer. "They had a particular strategy," Preuss said. "We thought that strategy was wrong." Israelis also resist Ameri- can Jewish traditions, con- ferencegoers said, particularly the tendency to center life around the synagogue. "For Israelis, synagogues do not have a good connotation," said Sarit Ron, who directs Chofshi b'Manhattan, an Is- raeli outreach initiative of the Stephen Wise Free Synagogue on New York's Upper West Side. "Their attitude is you're going to try and convert me." Ron said she has managed to build a community at the synagogue by peddling a low-key approach, emphasiz- ing the range of activities, including concerts by Israeli performers. Another draw has been sessions for children focusing on Israeli song and dance--a response to paren- tal anxieties about the loss of Israeli culture in the next generation. This was a repeated theme at the conference, with Israelis voicing concerns about their kids losing both their Israeli and Jewish identities. Shmuel Rosner, the Israeli journalist who blogs about theAmerican Jewish community and who appeared on a number of pan- els, enjoyed asking Israelis in the audience why they wanted to remain Jewish at all. "It doesn't matter if I want to forget I am Jewish," one older man said. "There will be somebody there to remind me." Another obstacle is the lack of Israeli familiarity with fun- draising for charitable causes, even those that fulfill their own needs. Rachel Davidson, a former New Jersey judge now on the IAC board, said social pressure was an avenue to getting Israelis to give. "Making being philan- thropic the price for social acceptance can be very effec- tive," Davidson said. With Israeli-American now referring to the children of Israelis, some of whom no longer speak fluent Hebrew, activists also faced a dilemma of when to switch content to English. On the confer- ence's last day, a young man approached Benhaim as he passed breakfast tables laden with bagels. "Ani rotzeh lehagid," the man said, using American- accented Hebrew for "I want to say." Then he paused and finished in English: "This was amazing." Hadassah's hospitals treat victims and terrorists the same By Barbara Sorer A first-hand account of a scene at the hospital. Outside the Swartz Cen- ter for Emergency Medicine at Hadassah's hospitals, TV cameramen are waiting for the blinking lights and sirens of the ambulance. One of the injured is already inside-- a young man who had been stabbed by a ter- rorist. The terrorist, allegedly as- sociated with Islamic jihad, had driven his vehicle into a bus stop, running over 26-year-old Dalia Lemkus. When his minivan hit an J + 00'-'omcrstonc H O S P I C E 5019096 obstruction, he jumped out and began stabbing her and others. A security guard from nearbyAlon Shvut shot him. The terrorist ran away after being shot, but the guard pursued him and shot him again. He will be coming in the second ambulance. The ambulance parks near the entrance of the CEM. Medics hurry around the back and carry a swarthy, bloodied man on a stretcher into the trauma center. "The terrorist," whispers a woman in the waiting room near ambulatory care. "It must be the terrorist." Heavily armed soldiers and police follow the stretch- er. Doctors, nurses, auxiliary staff, soldiers and police crowd into the trauma room. I'm there too, watching. The scene felt eerily familiar. Prominent Trauma Surgeon Avi Rivkind, internationally recognized for handling ter- ror treatment, will be orches- trating the care. In a sky blue shirt, Rivkind is in charge, quietly asking questions, looking for good answers, giving orders. The trauma unit was built in the wake of the Second Intifada, from 2000-2005, when half of the terror victims in the country were treated in Hadassah's hospitals. The terrorist is placed in the far left bay; the man he'd stabbed is to the right. How many times have I explained that we treat Jew and Arab, even terror victim and ter- rorist the same? The terror victim needs a CAT scan. The terrorist, identified as Maher Hadi a-Hashalmoun from He- bron, might have a bullet in his heart. The imaging technicians and the cardio- thoracic surgeon are sum- moned. A senior orthopedic surgeon stands by. A group of physicians hover over the computer to interpret the tests. Will the terrorist need heart surgery? The hospital director phones in a request to have operating room number eight readied. Just in case. The terror wctim's stab wounds are evaluated. One of the doctors says the first CAT scan is different from the second. They need to wait and see what develops. His family has arrived. The specialists who were supposed to be doing later- afternoon clinics ask for phone calls to be made to cancel their patients. This will take a while. There is news of another possible stabbing and an injury from a stoning. The empty bays of the trauma center don't need to be read- ied. They are always ready. 18 physicians-- among them Hadassah's most ex- perienced- stand around the terrorist. The cardiotho- racic surgeon reads the test results. No heart surgery needed. The bullet isn't in the heart. The surgeon orders an angiogram. The terrorist is wheeled out. The specialists begin to leave. The news reports that Dalia Lemkus, 26, died of her wounds at the site. The TV cameras have moved to the atrium of the Sarah Wetsman Davidson Tower. It's too cold and dark outside. Deputy Director Dr. Ashi Salmon is speaking before TV cameras. Channel 2, Channel 1, Channel 10. Patients from three other at- tacks are still at the hospital, he tells them. Patients are waiting for care at the ER walk-in service. Some are wearing kefiyyas, others streimels. Some are bare-headed. They are treated the same: Arab and Jew, religious and secu- lar, and even terror victim and terrorist. The same, the same, the same.