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PAGE 14A HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS,.NOVEMBER 21, 2014 New exhibit brings to life 350 years of American Jews in the military National Museum of American Jewish Military History A U.S. Marine in Vietnam featuring a Magen Davidon his helmet, circa 1968. By Hillel Kuttler WASHINGTON (JTA)--Me- mentos of Jacob Goldstein slide across the 3-foot-by-4- foot horizontal screen like cards being dealt at a casino: his photograph, his name, an Operation Urgent Fury head- - line denoting the 1983 mili- tary campaign in Grenada, Goldstein's explanatory text summarizing his role during the invasion. Even more striking than the photograph showing the uniformed rabbi wrap- ping tefillin on the Grenada beach with his rifle resting atop a mound of sandbags is his recollection of going from Lubavitch disciple in Brooklyn, N.Y., to a U.S. Army officer and chaplain attaining the rank of colonel. Goldstein is among the dozens of individual soldiers whose stories are told in an exhibition that opened Tues- day at the National Museum of American Jewish Military History. Titled "Jews in the Ameri- can Military," the exhibit engagingly conveys the role of American Jews in defend- ing their country, from Asser Levy's being granted the right to bear arms in 1657 to help protect Manhattan, to the 55 Jewish men and women killed in this era in Iraq and Afghanistan. The interactive digital table from whence Goldstein emerges is dubbed "Service Around the World." Pull up a chair, select a decade since the Cold War began in 1945, tap any dotarising across the map and learn about the American military's involvement in conflicts, events and humani- tarian missions. Many items include individuals' stories. Others, like the peacekeeping force that President Reagan dispatched to Lebanon, do not, but curators hope that Jewish veterans will write in with information that can be added. Elsewhere, the exhibit presents compelling text, photographs and artifacts in chronologically ordered sec- tions. Display cases present such Jewish gems as medals from the Civil War and the Spanish-American War; an 1899 prayer book; a captured German rifle from World War II; a Torah ark that a Chinese officer fashioned from teak as a gift to Morris Gordon, whom the officer had be- friended after saving Gordon from drowning during World War II. (Gordon would use" the ark while conducting services on the legendary Burma Road.) Custom Print Marting Invitations  Annouments Digital  Offset Printing Broches - Bocets Direct Mail Services Pcm & I_eds 407-767-7110 : ::::: ....... 205 North Street Lon,ood, FL 32750 v,,,elegantprn6ng.net L_ MenoonThis Ad and Receive 18% Discount - 193,745862 642819537 578236419 264973158 357128946 819564273 425697381 731482695 986351724 Nearby, from Guam, is the coconut that Seymour Silver- man mailed to his daughter Maurita--writing her name, their Portsmouth, Va., ad- dress, and a sketch of a palm tree on the fruit itself. Maurita Silverman would follow her father into the military, serv- ing as a nurse in the Vietnam War, according to museum archivist Pamela Elbe. "Jews in the American Military" is a permanent exhibition that took eight years to develop at a cost of $750,000. The funding was raisedby JewishWarVeterans of America groups and from the national office of JWV, an affiliate of the museum, with which it shares its brick DuPont Circle building. While the museum has mounted exhibitions on such themes as Korean War service and females serving in World War II, it has never presented a comprehensive look at the Jewish presence in the U.S. military from the start to present day, said museum coordinator Mike Rugd. Drawiflg on figures sup- JTA From page 13A approval rating of 23percent in the general population group and 70 percent among practicing Muslims. The surveys were released Sunday at the fifth annual national convention in Paris of the CRIF umbrella group of French Jewish communities and organizations. A total of 1,580 people older than 16 were polled after Sept. 25 by the IFOP poiling company and the Foundation for Political Innovation. In the first survey, 1,005 respondents from the general population answered a series of questions about their at- titudes toward Jews. Their answers were compared with responses several days later to the same questions by 575 people who said they were either Muslim or were born to a Muslim family. Among the general popula- tion, 32 percent of respon- dents agreed with the state- ment that "Jews use to their own benefit their status as National Museum of American Jewish Military History Artifact case showing objects from World War !1. plied by the National Jewish Welfare Board, which tends to the needs of Jewish soldiers, JWV and museum officials estimated, for example, that some 10,000 Jews fought in the Civil War, 225,000 in World War I and 550,000 in World War II. Contemporary member- ship numbers for JWV are modest, however, as older veterans are dying and the number of Jewish enlistees dropped once the compulsory draft was lifted following the Vietnam War. The organiza- tion now has 20,000 members, mostly World War II veterans, according to Norman Rosen- shein, its treasurer. To remain viable long term, JWV is recruiting returnees from Iraq and Afghanistan while offering free member- ship to the 20,000 Jewish soldiers now on active duty. Poor outreach seems to stand in the way, however. JWV's national chief of staff, Marsha Schjolberg, provided a telling example. When Schjolberg's daugh- ter, who works at the nearby Jewish Community Center of Greater Washington, sought to publicize a talk on this Veterans Day by a Jewish author of a new book on military heroism in Iraq and Afghanistan, a local JWV post refused to help promote the event. Indeed, said Schjolberg, a San Diego-area resident who served in the Naval Reserves for 28 years, she didn't learn of JWV's existence until after she had retired. Her late father, Harold Fuchs, aWorldWar IIveteran, lived just 10 blocks from a JWV post near Los Angeles and would eagerly have partici- pated in the organization had he known about it, she said. Schjoiberg said she hopes the exhibit helps inform non- Jews of the notable contribu- tions made by this one ethnic segment, of America. The exhibition abounds in examples. Col. Teddy Roos- evelt, the exhibit text states, held his Jewish soldiers in high regard and became a member of the Hebrew Veterans of the War with Spain, a precursor to JWV. A photograph shows Murray Blum, killed on Dec. 3, 1943, after rescuing a Mer- chant Marine shipmate when a German U-boat torpedoed their vessel. Then there's Col. Gerald Fink, a Korean War fighter pilot shown in his plane, "Big G" chalked on its door. The plane was shot down in 1951, and Fink was tortured as a prisoner of war. He passed his time woodworking and, using shattered glass and an improvised knife, sculpted a 3-foot crucifix memorial- izing Father Emil Kapaun, a Catholic chaplain and fellow American POW. "Surely, the crucifix made -by a Jew for a deceased priest in a Communist prison camp is unique," the exhibition's text states. "It was a point of pride for Col. Fink until his death in 1987." The National Museum of American Jewish Military History, at 1811R Street, N.W., in Washington, D.C., is open 9 a.m. to 5p.m. Mondays to Fridays, and by appointment on Sundays. It is closed on Jewish and federal holidays. victims of the Nazi genocide" compared to 56 percent of respondents from the Mus- lim group and among those who voted for the far-right National Front party in 2012. Among voters for the Front de Gauche far-left party, the assertion had a 51 percent approval rating. The existence of "an inter- national Zionist conspiracy" was endorsed by 16 percent of the general population and by 44 percent of Muslim respon- dents. The same figure among Front de Gauche voters called Zionism "a racist ideolo.gy" compared to 23 percent in the general population. In the general popula- tion group, 46 percent of respondents endorsed the description of Zionism as "an ideology that proclaims the right of the Jews to have their own country on their ancestors' land." Orthodox Jew stabbed in Antwerp in attack seen as anti-Semitic _ LIEGE, Belgium (JTA)--An Orthodox Jewish man who was stabbed in the neck in Antwerp in a suspected anti- Semitic attack was released from the hospital. Yehosha Malik, 31, sus- tained injuries classified as moderate on Saturday morn- ing in the capital of Belgium's Flemish region, the Gazet van Antwerpen reported. He was discharged the same day after medical staff determined his injuries were not life threat- ening. In an interviewwith Hadrei Haredim, a Hebrew-language news website, Malik said he felt a jab to his neck "and saw a young man eagerly trying to stab again." Malik was on his way to synagogue in the city's center, where a population of ap- proximately 16,000 Orthodox Jews reside. According to Malik's ac- count, the attacker fled after he was confronted by a wit- ness, also an Orthodox Jew. The region's Forum of Jewish Organizations wrote in a statement that "there is very real chance we are dealing with an act of pure anti-Semitism." Moshe Kantor, president of the European Jewish Con- gress, called on European authorities to step up efforts to protect Jewish communi- ties that are being targeted by Islamists and other parties. "There is a war against the Jews on the Internet and on the streets," he said. "Until there is a crackdown on incitement to hatred and anti-Semitism, then more people will believe that these types of attacks are legitimate. We call on Euro- pean authorities to form a spe- cially dedicated pan-European body to deal specifically with the wave of anti-Semitism and the threat of radical Islam that threatens Jews and the continent of Europe." Rabbi Menachem Margolin of the Brussels-based Euro- pean Jewish Association said his group will set meetings with European Union officials to discuss "the severity of the situation and ways to combat such phenomena at their core, through education." PAGE 14A HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS,.NOVEMBER 21, 2014 New exhibit brings to life 350 years of American Jews in the military National Museum of American Jewish Military History A U.S. Marine in Vietnam featuring a Magen Davidon his helmet, circa 1968. By Hillel Kuttler WASHINGTON (JTA)--Me- mentos of Jacob Goldstein slide across the 3-foot-by-4- foot horizontal screen like cards being dealt at a casino: his photograph, his name, an Operation Urgent Fury head- - line denoting the 1983 mili- tary campaign in Grenada, Goldstein's explanatory text summarizing his role during the invasion. Even more striking than the photograph showing the uniformed rabbi wrap- ping tefillin on the Grenada beach with his rifle resting atop a mound of sandbags is his recollection of going from Lubavitch disciple in Brooklyn, N.Y., to a U.S. Army officer and chaplain attaining the rank of colonel. Goldstein is among the dozens of individual soldiers whose stories are told in an exhibition that opened Tues- day at the National Museum of American Jewish Military History. Titled "Jews in the Ameri- can Military," the exhibit engagingly conveys the role of American Jews in defend- ing their country, from Asser Levy's being granted the right to bear arms in 1657 to help protect Manhattan, to the 55 Jewish men and women killed in this era in Iraq and Afghanistan. The interactive digital table from whence Goldstein emerges is dubbed "Service Around the World." Pull up a chair, select a decade since the Cold War began in 1945, tap any dotarising across the map and learn about the American military's involvement in conflicts, events and humani- tarian missions. Many items include individuals' stories. Others, like the peacekeeping force that President Reagan dispatched to Lebanon, do not, but curators hope that Jewish veterans will write in with information that can be added. Elsewhere, the exhibit presents compelling text, photographs and artifacts in chronologically ordered sec- tions. Display cases present such Jewish gems as medals from the Civil War and the Spanish-American War; an 1899 prayer book; a captured German rifle from World War II; a Torah ark that a Chinese officer fashioned from teak as a gift to Morris Gordon, whom the officer had be- friended after saving Gordon from drowning during World War II. (Gordon would use" the ark while conducting services on the legendary Burma Road.) Custom Print Marting Invitations  Annouments Digital  Offset Printing Broches - Bocets Direct Mail Services Pcm & I_eds 407-767-7110 : ::::: ....... 205 North Street Lon,ood, FL 32750 v,,,elegantprn6ng.net L_ MenoonThis Ad and Receive 18% Discount - 193,745862 642819537 578236419 264973158 357128946 819564273 425697381 731482695 986351724 Nearby, from Guam, is the coconut that Seymour Silver- man mailed to his daughter Maurita--writing her name, their Portsmouth, Va., ad- dress, and a sketch of a palm tree on the fruit itself. Maurita Silverman would follow her father into the military, serv- ing as a nurse in the Vietnam War, according to museum archivist Pamela Elbe. "Jews in the American Military" is a permanent exhibition that took eight years to develop at a cost of $750,000. The funding was raisedby JewishWarVeterans of America groups and from the national office of JWV, an affiliate of the museum, with which it shares its brick DuPont Circle building. While the museum has mounted exhibitions on such themes as Korean War service and females serving in World War II, it has never presented a comprehensive look at the Jewish presence in the U.S. military from the start to present day, said museum coordinator Mike Rugd. Drawiflg on figures sup- JTA From page 13A approval rating of 23percent in the general population group and 70 percent among practicing Muslims. The surveys were released Sunday at the fifth annual national convention in Paris of the CRIF umbrella group of French Jewish communities and organizations. A total of 1,580 people older than 16 were polled after Sept. 25 by the IFOP poiling company and the Foundation for Political Innovation. In the first survey, 1,005 respondents from the general population answered a series of questions about their at- titudes toward Jews. Their answers were compared with responses several days later to the same questions by 575 people who said they were either Muslim or were born to a Muslim family. Among the general popula- tion, 32 percent of respon- dents agreed with the state- ment that "Jews use to their own benefit their status as National Museum of American Jewish Military History Artifact case showing objects from World War !1. plied by the National Jewish Welfare Board, which tends to the needs of Jewish soldiers, JWV and museum officials estimated, for example, that some 10,000 Jews fought in the Civil War, 225,000 in World War I and 550,000 in World War II. Contemporary member- ship numbers for JWV are modest, however, as older veterans are dying and the number of Jewish enlistees dropped once the compulsory draft was lifted following the Vietnam War. The organiza- tion now has 20,000 members, mostly World War II veterans, according to Norman Rosen- shein, its treasurer. To remain viable long term, JWV is recruiting returnees from Iraq and Afghanistan while offering free member- ship to the 20,000 Jewish soldiers now on active duty. Poor outreach seems to stand in the way, however. JWV's national chief of staff, Marsha Schjolberg, provided a telling example. When Schjolberg's daugh- ter, who works at the nearby Jewish Community Center of Greater Washington, sought to publicize a talk on this Veterans Day by a Jewish author of a new book on military heroism in Iraq and Afghanistan, a local JWV post refused to help promote the event. Indeed, said Schjolberg, a San Diego-area resident who served in the Naval Reserves for 28 years, she didn't learn of JWV's existence until after she had retired. Her late father, Harold Fuchs, aWorldWar IIveteran, lived just 10 blocks from a JWV post near Los Angeles and would eagerly have partici- pated in the organization had he known about it, she said. Schjoiberg said she hopes the exhibit helps inform non- Jews of the notable contribu- tions made by this one ethnic segment, of America. The exhibition abounds in examples. Col. Teddy Roos- evelt, the exhibit text states, held his Jewish soldiers in high regard and became a member of the Hebrew Veterans of the War with Spain, a precursor to JWV. A photograph shows Murray Blum, killed on Dec. 3, 1943, after rescuing a Mer- chant Marine shipmate when a German U-boat torpedoed their vessel. Then there's Col. Gerald Fink, a Korean War fighter pilot shown in his plane, "Big G" chalked on its door. The plane was shot down in 1951, and Fink was tortured as a prisoner of war. He passed his time woodworking and, using shattered glass and an improvised knife, sculpted a 3-foot crucifix memorial- izing Father Emil Kapaun, a Catholic chaplain and fellow American POW. "Surely, the crucifix made -by a Jew for a deceased priest in a Communist prison camp is unique," the exhibition's text states. "It was a point of pride for Col. Fink until his death in 1987." The National Museum of American Jewish Military History, at 1811R Street, N.W., in Washington, D.C., is open 9 a.m. to 5p.m. Mondays to Fridays, and by appointment on Sundays. It is closed on Jewish and federal holidays. victims of the Nazi genocide" compared to 56 percent of respondents from the Mus- lim group and among those who voted for the far-right National Front party in 2012. Among voters for the Front de Gauche far-left party, the assertion had a 51 percent approval rating. The existence of "an inter- national Zionist conspiracy" was endorsed by 16 percent of the general population and by 44 percent of Muslim respon- dents. The same figure among Front de Gauche voters called Zionism "a racist ideolo.gy" compared to 23 percent in the general population. In the general popula- tion group, 46 percent of respondents endorsed the description of Zionism as "an ideology that proclaims the right of the Jews to have their own country on their ancestors' land." Orthodox Jew stabbed in Antwerp in attack seen as anti-Semitic _ LIEGE, Belgium (JTA)--An Orthodox Jewish man who was stabbed in the neck in Antwerp in a suspected anti- Semitic attack was released from the hospital. Yehosha Malik, 31, sus- tained injuries classified as moderate on Saturday morn- ing in the capital of Belgium's Flemish region, the Gazet van Antwerpen reported. He was discharged the same day after medical staff determined his injuries were not life threat- ening. In an interviewwith Hadrei Haredim, a Hebrew-language news website, Malik said he felt a jab to his neck "and saw a young man eagerly trying to stab again." Malik was on his way to synagogue in the city's center, where a population of ap- proximately 16,000 Orthodox Jews reside. According to Malik's ac- count, the attacker fled after he was confronted by a wit- ness, also an Orthodox Jew. The region's Forum of Jewish Organizations wrote in a statement that "there is very real chance we are dealing with an act of pure anti-Semitism." Moshe Kantor, president of the European Jewish Con- gress, called on European authorities to step up efforts to protect Jewish communi- ties that are being targeted by Islamists and other parties. "There is a war against the Jews on the Internet and on the streets," he said. "Until there is a crackdown on incitement to hatred and anti-Semitism, then more people will believe that these types of attacks are legitimate. We call on Euro- pean authorities to form a spe- cially dedicated pan-European body to deal specifically with the wave of anti-Semitism and the threat of radical Islam that threatens Jews and the continent of Europe." Rabbi Menachem Margolin of the Brussels-based Euro- pean Jewish Association said his group will set meetings with European Union officials to discuss "the severity of the situation and ways to combat such phenomena at their core, through education."