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PAGE 8A HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 2014 At Thanksgiving time, making a leap to feed the needy Fran Stempel Susan Baigelman, who runs a food pantry out of the Soref JCC in Plantation, Fla., says that those who come to the pantry "could be your next door neighbor or sit at the Groups must provide portable toilets and hand-washing sta- tions. And like a restaurant, they must maintain the food at precisely prescribed tem- peratures. "I believe I am my brother's keeper," Abbott told the Sun- Sentinel recently. "I'm Jewish, and in Judaism they say that if you save one person, you save the world." His organization's name, Love Thy Neighbor, is found in Leviticus. Mulling Abbott's words, as I shop for Thanksgiving, I wonder: As we have accli- mated ourselves to a night of secular feasting, have we also integrated into our cel- desk across from you.' By Edmon J. Rodman LOS ANGELES (JTA)--As we prepare for our Thanks- giving feasts, a 90-year-old Jewish man named Arnold Abbott is stirring the pot in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., about hunger and homelessness in America. Or is it that Abbott, who in defiance of a controversial new city ordinance has been cited several times for feed- ing the homeless outdoors, is just asking us to pay more than lip service to our Jew- ish ideals? The ordinance limits where outdoor feeding sites can be located and requires permits. Stephenie Layne Pollock and Daniel Charles Poris Sudoku (see page 14 for solution SUDOKU Dr. Ray Pollock of Melbourne, Fla., and Valerie Pollock of Orlando, Fla., are pleased to announce the engage- ment of their daughter, Dr. Stephenie Layne Pollock to Daniel Charles Poris, son of John Poris of Hollywood, Fla., and Amalia Poris of West Bloomfield, Mich. The bride-elect received her bachelor's degree from the University of Florida and her doctor of medicine degree from Florida State University. She is a general surgery resident at Florida Hospital. The groom-elect received his bachelor's degree from the University of Michigan and is responsible for New Business Development at GLE Scrap Metal in Orlando, Fla. The couple and their families are excited to be the first wedding at the new Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts in Orlando in February 2015. ebration Jewish ideas about hospitality and to "not stand idly by"? Sure, I can find kosher tur- keys, stuffing and cranberry sauce stocked on the super- market shelves, but how will all that save even one person? Looking for an answer, I spoke with Susan Baigelman, who a few miles inland from where Abbott distributes hot meals on the Fort Lauderdale beach runs the WECARE Food Pantry. The pantry, whose home is the Soref Jewish Community Center in Plantation, Fla., serves about 10,000 people a year, giving out 3,500 bags of nonperishable groceries supplemented with fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as bread donated by a local bakery. Each bag is valued between $40 and $50, Baigel- man told me. Among the people the program serves are "seniors, Holocaust survivors, people living on fixed income and single parents with children," she said. Also, the disabled, people with mental health issues and the unemployed, as well as those who are working. Baigeiman, who has di- rected the program for over 12 years and says she knows Abbott, has learned that those who come to the pantry may not be who you expect. "They could be your next door neighbor or sit at the desk across from you," she said. "We get people who say 'I never thought I would be doing this. I used to donate.'" After paying rent or their mortgage, the electricity and medical expenses, people are having trouble making ends meet, said Baigelman, adding that some of the pantry's cli- ents are "sleeping in their car." "We need to help people move forward," she said. "I wish I was out of a job because nobody would be hungry anymore." The Long Island native, who has lived in Florida for 35 years, adds, "Don't you think Baigelman is a good name to run a food pantry? It was bashert." Throughout the year, and especially during the holiday season--at Thanksgiving they try to have turkeys to give--the pantry's efforts are supported by the local Jewish community, which organizes food drives and contributes funding. "Hunger never takes a vacation," said Baigelman, who unknowingly was also reminding me how that "one person" is saved. As to Abbott's efforts and the attention they are being given, Baigelman said he was bringing "awareness" to the situation. It has. Besides the headlines, and Steven Colbert lampooning the city, on the other side of the country, in San Diego, Calif., just days after Abbott becomes national news, Rabbi Yael Ridberg in an online "Torah Talk" saw a parallel between Abbott's actions and that of one of the forefathers. "I felt for a moment that I was reading a modern-day story ofAbraham,"wrote Rid- berg of the Reconstructionist Congregation Dor Hadash. When I spoke with her, Ridberg explained that in the Torah portionVayera, Abraham is sitting in his tent in the heat of the day, and as three strang- ers approach he "leaps up" and "runs to greet his guests." "It didn't matter what was going on his life, he had guests to attend to," she said. Listening to the rabbi, I saw the parallel: Abbott in his way was leaping up, too, and that feeding the hungry in public was his own take on hospitality. Abbott "has a certain call- ing to feed the hungry," even though he lives in a city that "has told him, and everyone else, this is against the law," Ridberg said. "He is not de- terred. "Our Torah teaches us that we are to take care of the poor, the stranger, the widow," and that "we are obligated to remember the heart of the stranger," she said. "To just arrest a 90-year- old man for feeding the hungry and not address the underlying issues that have caused hunger and home- lessness in America, I think is not the whole equation. How about getting more re- sources to the local homeless shelters?" And what about provid- ing more food and support, I thought, especially before Thanksgiving, to the programs run by Abbott and Baigelman, as well as to others across the country who feed the hungry? Later, rolling through the supermarket, I realized that to save that one person, I would need to make my own leap. Edmon J. Rodman is a JTA columnist who writes on Jewish life from Los Angeles. Contact him at edmojace@ gmail.com. Jewish Pavilion Friends visits residential home Turned Assisted Living Facility --- ..... q .......... thrive in our residential set- Shown here are (l-r), Jennifer Trotter, Sutton Homes marketing director; Toby Yande- mark, Pavilion treasurer; Mike Flahaven, Pavilion sponsor; Ruth Darvin, Friends board president; and Elise Schilowitz, president of the board, in front of a Sutton Homes resi- dential memory care home. By Pamela Ruben you could save 28%" Cell 1-800-970-4376 to see how much you could save on car insurance. esuronce "National average onnual savings Icsed on cloto from customers who reorled savings by switching to or, AIIstate'compony Esuronce between 12/1/11 and 4/30/12 2032 Ee Ir,su,lce Ser,kes, h  All dghts rese/ved, CA Lite,se t 0C7829 19 74 8 3 9 6 2 1 57 1 894 9 3 5 4 9 3 51 24 StatePoint Media Fill in the blank squares in the grid, making sure that every row, column and 3-by-3 box includes all digits 1 through 9. Last October, members of the Jewish Pavilion's Friends Board were introduced to Sutton Homes by market- ing director Jennifer Trotter at their monthly meeting. The board was intrigued by the concept of residential memory care, as each of the ting," said Trotter. "They rely on the familiarity of living at home, which helps them retain their memories. Our small pool of caregivers know the residents by name and can meet their individual needs." The Sutton Home is com- pletely secured with a keypad and fencing to keep the memory care residents safe and secure. Inside the home the five residents were comfortably seated at the dining room table. Lunch was being pre- pared by their caregiver in the kitchen, and the residents chatted for a moment with the visitors. The five private bedrooms were decorated with the residents' own fur- nishings, and filled with family photos and personal knickknacks. Friends board president, Ruth Darvin, was impressed with the personal touches that made the facility into a home. She spent time "Our memory care patients thrive in our residential setting..." nine Sutton Homes in the Orlando area house five or less residents. On Nov. 3, Trotter returned to the monthly meeting and took a handful of board members on a guided tour of a nearby facility. The group visited a Sutton Home in Altamonte Springs tucked away on a cul-de-sac in a well-maintained subdivision, just minutes away from their meeting place at Horizon Bay on Boston Avenue. Upon arriving the group was struck by the "homey" setting of the elder facility, which looked just like any other home in neighborhood. "Our memory care patients admiring the photographs that lined the walls of one bedroom. She shared, "All these personal items are a wonderful way to help the residents remember their families and the past." Board member Toby Van- demark stated, "My father and stepmother were housed in a similar setting in Palm Springs. They thrived in the smaller environment, and it lowered the stress levels of the whole family." For more information, con- tact Jennifer Trotter of Sutton Homes at 407-740-8815 or send an email to j trotter@sut- tonhomes.com or visit www. suttonhomes.com. PAGE 8A HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 2014 At Thanksgiving time, making a leap to feed the needy Fran Stempel Susan Baigelman, who runs a food pantry out of the Soref JCC in Plantation, Fla., says that those who come to the pantry "could be your next door neighbor or sit at the Groups must provide portable toilets and hand-washing sta- tions. And like a restaurant, they must maintain the food at precisely prescribed tem- peratures. "I believe I am my brother's keeper," Abbott told the Sun- Sentinel recently. "I'm Jewish, and in Judaism they say that if you save one person, you save the world." His organization's name, Love Thy Neighbor, is found in Leviticus. Mulling Abbott's words, as I shop for Thanksgiving, I wonder: As we have accli- mated ourselves to a night of secular feasting, have we also integrated into our cel- desk across from you.' By Edmon J. Rodman LOS ANGELES (JTA)--As we prepare for our Thanks- giving feasts, a 90-year-old Jewish man named Arnold Abbott is stirring the pot in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., about hunger and homelessness in America. Or is it that Abbott, who in defiance of a controversial new city ordinance has been cited several times for feed- ing the homeless outdoors, is just asking us to pay more than lip service to our Jew- ish ideals? The ordinance limits where outdoor feeding sites can be located and requires permits. Stephenie Layne Pollock and Daniel Charles Poris Sudoku (see page 14 for solution SUDOKU Dr. Ray Pollock of Melbourne, Fla., and Valerie Pollock of Orlando, Fla., are pleased to announce the engage- ment of their daughter, Dr. Stephenie Layne Pollock to Daniel Charles Poris, son of John Poris of Hollywood, Fla., and Amalia Poris of West Bloomfield, Mich. The bride-elect received her bachelor's degree from the University of Florida and her doctor of medicine degree from Florida State University. She is a general surgery resident at Florida Hospital. The groom-elect received his bachelor's degree from the University of Michigan and is responsible for New Business Development at GLE Scrap Metal in Orlando, Fla. The couple and their families are excited to be the first wedding at the new Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts in Orlando in February 2015. ebration Jewish ideas about hospitality and to "not stand idly by"? Sure, I can find kosher tur- keys, stuffing and cranberry sauce stocked on the super- market shelves, but how will all that save even one person? Looking for an answer, I spoke with Susan Baigelman, who a few miles inland from where Abbott distributes hot meals on the Fort Lauderdale beach runs the WECARE Food Pantry. The pantry, whose home is the Soref Jewish Community Center in Plantation, Fla., serves about 10,000 people a year, giving out 3,500 bags of nonperishable groceries supplemented with fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as bread donated by a local bakery. Each bag is valued between $40 and $50, Baigel- man told me. Among the people the program serves are "seniors, Holocaust survivors, people living on fixed income and single parents with children," she said. Also, the disabled, people with mental health issues and the unemployed, as well as those who are working. Baigeiman, who has di- rected the program for over 12 years and says she knows Abbott, has learned that those who come to the pantry may not be who you expect. "They could be your next door neighbor or sit at the desk across from you," she said. "We get people who say 'I never thought I would be doing this. I used to donate.'" After paying rent or their mortgage, the electricity and medical expenses, people are having trouble making ends meet, said Baigelman, adding that some of the pantry's cli- ents are "sleeping in their car." "We need to help people move forward," she said. "I wish I was out of a job because nobody would be hungry anymore." The Long Island native, who has lived in Florida for 35 years, adds, "Don't you think Baigelman is a good name to run a food pantry? It was bashert." Throughout the year, and especially during the holiday season--at Thanksgiving they try to have turkeys to give--the pantry's efforts are supported by the local Jewish community, which organizes food drives and contributes funding. "Hunger never takes a vacation," said Baigelman, who unknowingly was also reminding me how that "one person" is saved. As to Abbott's efforts and the attention they are being given, Baigelman said he was bringing "awareness" to the situation. It has. Besides the headlines, and Steven Colbert lampooning the city, on the other side of the country, in San Diego, Calif., just days after Abbott becomes national news, Rabbi Yael Ridberg in an online "Torah Talk" saw a parallel between Abbott's actions and that of one of the forefathers. "I felt for a moment that I was reading a modern-day story ofAbraham,"wrote Rid- berg of the Reconstructionist Congregation Dor Hadash. When I spoke with her, Ridberg explained that in the Torah portionVayera, Abraham is sitting in his tent in the heat of the day, and as three strang- ers approach he "leaps up" and "runs to greet his guests." "It didn't matter what was going on his life, he had guests to attend to," she said. Listening to the rabbi, I saw the parallel: Abbott in his way was leaping up, too, and that feeding the hungry in public was his own take on hospitality. Abbott "has a certain call- ing to feed the hungry," even though he lives in a city that "has told him, and everyone else, this is against the law," Ridberg said. "He is not de- terred. "Our Torah teaches us that we are to take care of the poor, the stranger, the widow," and that "we are obligated to remember the heart of the stranger," she said. "To just arrest a 90-year- old man for feeding the hungry and not address the underlying issues that have caused hunger and home- lessness in America, I think is not the whole equation. How about getting more re- sources to the local homeless shelters?" And what about provid- ing more food and support, I thought, especially before Thanksgiving, to the programs run by Abbott and Baigelman, as well as to others across the country who feed the hungry? Later, rolling through the supermarket, I realized that to save that one person, I would need to make my own leap. Edmon J. Rodman is a JTA columnist who writes on Jewish life from Los Angeles. Contact him at edmojace@ gmail.com. Jewish Pavilion Friends visits residential home Turned Assisted Living Facility --- ..... q .......... thrive in our residential set- Shown here are (l-r), Jennifer Trotter, Sutton Homes marketing director; Toby Yande- mark, Pavilion treasurer; Mike Flahaven, Pavilion sponsor; Ruth Darvin, Friends board president; and Elise Schilowitz, president of the board, in front of a Sutton Homes resi- dential memory care home. By Pamela Ruben you could save 28%" Cell 1-800-970-4376 to see how much you could save on car insurance. esuronce "National average onnual savings Icsed on cloto from customers who reorled savings by switching to or, AIIstate'compony Esuronce between 12/1/11 and 4/30/12 2032 Ee Ir,su,lce Ser,kes, h  All dghts rese/ved, CA Lite,se t 0C7829 19 74 8 3 9 6 2 1 57 1 894 9 3 5 4 9 3 51 24 StatePoint Media Fill in the blank squares in the grid, making sure that every row, column and 3-by-3 box includes all digits 1 through 9. Last October, members of the Jewish Pavilion's Friends Board were introduced to Sutton Homes by market- ing director Jennifer Trotter at their monthly meeting. The board was intrigued by the concept of residential memory care, as each of the ting," said Trotter. "They rely on the familiarity of living at home, which helps them retain their memories. Our small pool of caregivers know the residents by name and can meet their individual needs." The Sutton Home is com- pletely secured with a keypad and fencing to keep the memory care residents safe and secure. Inside the home the five residents were comfortably seated at the dining room table. Lunch was being pre- pared by their caregiver in the kitchen, and the residents chatted for a moment with the visitors. The five private bedrooms were decorated with the residents' own fur- nishings, and filled with family photos and personal knickknacks. Friends board president, Ruth Darvin, was impressed with the personal touches that made the facility into a home. She spent time "Our memory care patients thrive in our residential setting..." nine Sutton Homes in the Orlando area house five or less residents. On Nov. 3, Trotter returned to the monthly meeting and took a handful of board members on a guided tour of a nearby facility. The group visited a Sutton Home in Altamonte Springs tucked away on a cul-de-sac in a well-maintained subdivision, just minutes away from their meeting place at Horizon Bay on Boston Avenue. Upon arriving the group was struck by the "homey" setting of the elder facility, which looked just like any other home in neighborhood. "Our memory care patients admiring the photographs that lined the walls of one bedroom. She shared, "All these personal items are a wonderful way to help the residents remember their families and the past." Board member Toby Van- demark stated, "My father and stepmother were housed in a similar setting in Palm Springs. They thrived in the smaller environment, and it lowered the stress levels of the whole family." For more information, con- tact Jennifer Trotter of Sutton Homes at 407-740-8815 or send an email to j trotter@sut- tonhomes.com or visit www. suttonhomes.com.