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HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 2014 PAGE 5A Turning the page on the special U.S,-Israel relationship By Danny Danon JNS.org The Nov. 4 midterm elec- tion results have obvious implications for American domestic policy. For us in Israel, however, the new Con- gress and the last two years of President Barack Obama's administration present a unique opportunity. Now is the perfect time to turn the page on U.S.-Israel relations. Our two govern- ments should use this time to work together as a united front against the challenges facing the free world. While there will of course continue to be areas of disagreement between our governments, we both have much to gain by putting these differences aside and placing the issues that unite us as our top prior- ity for the remaining years of the Obama presidency. There is no denying that during the past •few months we have witnessed some low points in U.S.- Israel relations, especially in terms of rhetoric used. Like most Israelis of all political persuasions, I was deeply disappointed--and even offended--by the crass words used by senior Obama administration Officials to describe Prime Minister Ben- jamin Netanyahu. That type of language should never be used in diplomatic par- lance, let alone to describe the democratically elected leader of an American ally. While these anonymous quotes ridiculing Prime Minister Netanyahu were troubling, it is the actions of the Obama administration in recent months that have close observers of this special relationship more concerned than ever. Continued U.S. eco - nomic and military support for Qatar is one such example. As Qatar has openly increased its financial and logistical support for the murderous terrorists of Hamas, we did not see our American friends distance themselves from their Gulf ally. Instead, there have been too many instances of declared friendship between the world's greatest democ- racy and the Middle Eastern monarchy that supported the terrorists who bombarded our cities in Israel this past summer. Another example has been the official American reaction to Israel's construction policy in our capital. I have lost count" of the number of times the Obama administration has criticized our government's decision to plan new housing in Jerusalem, even when these plans benefit both the city's Jewish and Arab populations. When you compare the official statements coming from the Obama administration with the muted reaction to of- ficial Palestinian incitement against Israel and the Jewish people, the situation becomes even more troubling. Just recently, Palestinian Authority (PA) President Mahmoud Abbas sent a con- dolence letter praising a ter- rorist killed after he opened fire on the police officers attempting to arrest him for critically injuring an Israeli in Jerusalem the night before. It is puzzling how senior Obama administration officials view the building of homes in Je- rusalem neighborhoods that everyone agrees will remain under Israeli sovereignty in peace agreements as more of a threat to peace than the culture of violence fostered by the PA. With the forthcoming swearing-in of the new Con- gress, both of our govern- ments shofild seize the op- portunity to refocus our relationship. It goes without saying that name-calling and public spats in the media should be pushed aside. More importantly, however, our two countries should immediately begin to prioritize our joint efforts in facing the two main threats to peace and security in the Middle East, if not the entire world. ThoughIslamic State is still small in numbers, it is quickly growing and capitalizing on the weakness of the Arab States in the region that have been crumbling before our eyes over the past few years. Here in Israel we do not see Islamic State as an existential threat, especially in compari- son to other regional terrorist organizations such as Hamas and Hezbollah. Nevertheless, there is no doubt that Islamic State is-a serious danger to the Middle East's moderate regimes, and to our most important ally--the U.S. This is why we should redouble our efforts to destroy this despi- cable organization. Even more importantly, now is the time for Israel and the U.S.--together with the • international community-- to work hand in hand to end the threat of a nuclear-armed Iran. Through joint coop- eration between our govern- ments, we can work to im- prove the current agreement under negotiation. I know that many in Congress share Israel's conviction that a bad deal, which removes sanctions and leaves Iran with the capa- bility to arm themselves with nuclear weapons with relative ease, is worse than no deal at all. A comprehensive agree- ment can only be reached if the Iranians understand that the U.S. and the international communitywill not only leave the sanctions in place until this is achieved, but are will- ing to use any and all options available to us to prevent the ayatollahs from threatening world peace. The key strength of the U.S.-Israel relationship has always been its bipartisan nature. Despite periodic dis- agreements, our alliance has flourished over the past six decades--whether either a Democratic or Republican president is in the White House and whether either the Likud or Labor governs Israel. This call to refocus our ties on the important interests that bind us does not result from the change to a Republican majority in the Senate, but from the fact that midterm elections have historically been a time for an American administration to take stock of its policies and plan ap- propriately for the remainder of its term. It is my hope that both sides will heed this call. There are too many important issues at stake and too many interests to safeguard for us not to do so. Member of Knesset Danny Danon is the chair of the Likud Central Committee and Israel's former deputy minister of Defense. Speaking out against the brutal terrorist attacks in Israel B'nai B'rith International and the Conference of Presi- dents of Major American Jewish Organizations are outraged by the continued terror attacks against Israeli civilians and soldiers, and con- demn th deafening silence from the international com- munity on these violent acts. "The escalating terrorist attacks in Jerusalem and other areas are of grave concern and must be put to an end. Israel must do every- thing possible to protect its citizens and restore peaceful conditions," said Conference of Presidents leaders Robert Sugarman, Chairman, and Malcolm Hoenlein, Executive Vice Chairman/CEO in a joint statement. Strong words that need to be said and heard, but it seems they are falling on deaf international ears. It isn't only these groups voicing outrage. The people of Israel--the terrorists' tar- gets--are beginning to say enough is enough. On Nov. 10 Israel Defense Forces Staff Sgt. Almog Shiloni was stabbed multiple times in Tel Aviv while re- turning to his military base. Shiloni eventually died of his wounds. He was 20 years old. "To the government, we say: 'wake up!'" Israel's Maariv reported his twin brother, Sahar, saying. "Your soldiers are defend- ing the country, and see what's going on here? My family is all soldiers--we can't watch the blood that is being spilled here. What is happening in this country is catastrophic; terrifying," Sahar said in his grief. A crowd of furious pedestri- ans in Tel Aviv heckled Interior Security Minister Yitzhak Aharonovitch, as he arrived at the scene of the attack a short time later for a police briefing. "Our blood is not cheap," angry residents shouted at Aharonovitch. "The leftists are respon- sible for all this. They're the ones shedding our blood; our blood is not cheap," one man shouted at the minister, who did not respond, according to Israel's Channel 2 News. Hours earlier, 26-year-old Israeli Dahlia Lemkus was fatally stabbed and two more were injured in Alon Shvut, an Israeli settlement located southwest of Jerusalem, one kilometer northeast of Kfar Etzion. The attack was al- legedly carried out by Maher Hamdi A-Shalmon, who was jailed from 2000 to 2005 for throwing firebombs at Israeli troops. These attacks come on the heels of two car-based terror attacks at Jerusalem light-rail stations in which many were injured and killed, including a 3-month-oldAmerican child named Chaya Zissel Braun. Economy Minister, Naftali Bennett said in comment, "It is not possible to barricade people in the streets, but rather we must put those responsible for incitement, fireworks and the rioters in jail. This is correct security policy," said Bennett, who opposed the emplacement of large concrete blocks at bus and train stations in Jerusa- lem in the wake of the two vehicular ramming attacks. Also on Nov. 10, unknown vandals scrawled graffiti read- ing "Death to Jews" alongside a swastika on an exterior wall of the Salesian Church of Jesus the Adolescent in Nazareth. To make matters worse, instead of condemning these attacks, Mahmoud Abbas made references to ignite a religious war, and urged blocking Jews from entering the Temple Mount 'by all means necessary.' "The PalestinianAuthority must immediately take steps to restore order. Mahmoud Abbas and other Palestinian -officials must end their incite- ful :omments. His reference denying any Jewish connec- tion to its holiest site only serves to raise tensions and encourage further violence. These attacks should instead be condemned by Mr. Abbas and the Palestinian leader- ship, international commu- nity and the United Nations," said Sugarman and Hoenlein. Despite the rash of terror attacks, the international community--and the United Nations in particular--has said nothing. "Every day Israelis are coming under attack. Every day the crowds of violent Pal- estinian rioters grow larger," Israeli Ambassador to the U.N. Ron Prosor told reporters at the United Nations on Nov. 10. "And yet, this institu- tion has not uttered a word to denounce attacl(s against Israelis. Ignoring incitement and terrorism is similar to supporting terrorism." Prosor is absolutely correct in his assessment. The United Nations' silence is a continu- ation of the double-standard with which it treats Israel. If attacks such as these occurred in any other country with the regularity that they have occurred iMsrael, the United Nations and countries around the globe would issue con- demnations and offer support. With the increased focus on terrorism by the international community--especially in theMiddle East--the lack of any reaction from the world body or its member states is conspicuous and wrong. Finance Minister Yair La- pid, in comment, called on the public to exercise restraint in the face of the terror wave. "We standwith our security forces and we call upon all of Israel's citizens to let the IDF, Shin Bet and police force do their jobs," he said at the open- ing ofa Yesh Arid Party faction session, according to his office. Lapid cautioned that"There is no place for calls for revenge in a country which values life just as there is no place for chants of 'Death to the Arabs.' Instead of strengthen- s. ing us,at this difficult time, -it weakens us." So, while the people of Israel will be vigilant to not call for revenge, and continue to value life as they always have, B'nai B'rith International will continue to draw attention to terrorist attacks such as the ones seen recently. The con- stant threats faced by Israel and Israelis from terrorist organizations and their fol- lowers must not be ignored. Perhaps eventually deaf ears will hear. This article was compiled by Christine DeSouza. Dry Bones Voyeurism is a form of sexual assault • By Deborah Rosenbloom WASHINGTON (JTA)-- With all the conversations surrounding the allegations against my congregation's for- mer rabbi, Barry Freundel, no one is saying what desperately needs to be said--that voyeur- ism is sexual assault and that eliminating sexual assault in our communities should be the direction of our next steps. In emails, blogs and ar- ticles, the reaction to allega- tions that Freundel installed hidden cameras in order to view women in the mikveh has focused repeatedly on the specific location of the crime, the importance of making mikvehs safer and the abuse of rabbinic authority. But de- ciding to change who controls the mikveh is a narrow per- spective on the wider issue of • violence against women, and addressing this as an isolated incident would be a mistake. Although considering policies to make our religious spaces safer is certainly worthwhile, it is important that we recog- nize voyeurism as a form of sexual assault, with its own place on the spectrum of violence against women. Sexual assault is often thought to be synonymous with rape. But according to the National Institute of Justice, sexual assault encompasses a range of unwanted sexual behaviors, including voyeur- ism. Whether the perpetrator is peeping through a window, hidingvideo cameras in locker rooms, posting illegally ob- tained intimate photographs or forwarding explicit private photographs intended for one viewer only, he is committing• sexual assault. The true nature of the crime is masked by the use of the word "voyeurism," which makes it seem as if there were no victim. This is an issue of substance and not merely semantics. Think about it. When a robbery occurs, there is a victim--someone is robbed. When a murder occurs, some- one is killed. But voyeurism? Someone is "voyeured"? It's as if there is no victim, only a perpetrator. The victim is the object--the thing that is watched. But women are not objects. This is not a victimless crime. And that's the point. Women know, whether con- sciously or not, that voyeur- ism is part of the continuum of violence against women, a continuum with catcalling on the less severe end and violent rape on the most se- vere end. Hypersexualization and objectification of women devalues women. When we see women as objects--when we dehumanize women--we enable violence. With this understanding, our response to a high school student who forwards explicit pictures of his girlfriend to Rosenbloom on page 15A FightAntisemitism go to: igg.me/at/drybones HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 2014 PAGE 5A Turning the page on the special U.S,-Israel relationship By Danny Danon JNS.org The Nov. 4 midterm elec- tion results have obvious implications for American domestic policy. For us in Israel, however, the new Con- gress and the last two years of President Barack Obama's administration present a unique opportunity. Now is the perfect time to turn the page on U.S.-Israel relations. Our two govern- ments should use this time to work together as a united front against the challenges facing the free world. While there will of course continue to be areas of disagreement between our governments, we both have much to gain by putting these differences aside and placing the issues that unite us as our top prior- ity for the remaining years of the Obama presidency. There is no denying that during the past •few months we have witnessed some low points in U.S.- Israel relations, especially in terms of rhetoric used. Like most Israelis of all political persuasions, I was deeply disappointed--and even offended--by the crass words used by senior Obama administration Officials to describe Prime Minister Ben- jamin Netanyahu. That type of language should never be used in diplomatic par- lance, let alone to describe the democratically elected leader of an American ally. While these anonymous quotes ridiculing Prime Minister Netanyahu were troubling, it is the actions of the Obama administration in recent months that have close observers of this special relationship more concerned than ever. Continued U.S. eco - nomic and military support for Qatar is one such example. As Qatar has openly increased its financial and logistical support for the murderous terrorists of Hamas, we did not see our American friends distance themselves from their Gulf ally. Instead, there have been too many instances of declared friendship between the world's greatest democ- racy and the Middle Eastern monarchy that supported the terrorists who bombarded our cities in Israel this past summer. Another example has been the official American reaction to Israel's construction policy in our capital. I have lost count" of the number of times the Obama administration has criticized our government's decision to plan new housing in Jerusalem, even when these plans benefit both the city's Jewish and Arab populations. When you compare the official statements coming from the Obama administration with the muted reaction to of- ficial Palestinian incitement against Israel and the Jewish people, the situation becomes even more troubling. Just recently, Palestinian Authority (PA) President Mahmoud Abbas sent a con- dolence letter praising a ter- rorist killed after he opened fire on the police officers attempting to arrest him for critically injuring an Israeli in Jerusalem the night before. It is puzzling how senior Obama administration officials view the building of homes in Je- rusalem neighborhoods that everyone agrees will remain under Israeli sovereignty in peace agreements as more of a threat to peace than the culture of violence fostered by the PA. With the forthcoming swearing-in of the new Con- gress, both of our govern- ments shofild seize the op- portunity to refocus our relationship. It goes without saying that name-calling and public spats in the media should be pushed aside. More importantly, however, our two countries should immediately begin to prioritize our joint efforts in facing the two main threats to peace and security in the Middle East, if not the entire world. ThoughIslamic State is still small in numbers, it is quickly growing and capitalizing on the weakness of the Arab States in the region that have been crumbling before our eyes over the past few years. Here in Israel we do not see Islamic State as an existential threat, especially in compari- son to other regional terrorist organizations such as Hamas and Hezbollah. Nevertheless, there is no doubt that Islamic State is-a serious danger to the Middle East's moderate regimes, and to our most important ally--the U.S. This is why we should redouble our efforts to destroy this despi- cable organization. Even more importantly, now is the time for Israel and the U.S.--together with the • international community-- to work hand in hand to end the threat of a nuclear-armed Iran. Through joint coop- eration between our govern- ments, we can work to im- prove the current agreement under negotiation. I know that many in Congress share Israel's conviction that a bad deal, which removes sanctions and leaves Iran with the capa- bility to arm themselves with nuclear weapons with relative ease, is worse than no deal at all. A comprehensive agree- ment can only be reached if the Iranians understand that the U.S. and the international communitywill not only leave the sanctions in place until this is achieved, but are will- ing to use any and all options available to us to prevent the ayatollahs from threatening world peace. The key strength of the U.S.-Israel relationship has always been its bipartisan nature. Despite periodic dis- agreements, our alliance has flourished over the past six decades--whether either a Democratic or Republican president is in the White House and whether either the Likud or Labor governs Israel. This call to refocus our ties on the important interests that bind us does not result from the change to a Republican majority in the Senate, but from the fact that midterm elections have historically been a time for an American administration to take stock of its policies and plan ap- propriately for the remainder of its term. It is my hope that both sides will heed this call. There are too many important issues at stake and too many interests to safeguard for us not to do so. Member of Knesset Danny Danon is the chair of the Likud Central Committee and Israel's former deputy minister of Defense. Speaking out against the brutal terrorist attacks in Israel B'nai B'rith International and the Conference of Presi- dents of Major American Jewish Organizations are outraged by the continued terror attacks against Israeli civilians and soldiers, and con- demn th deafening silence from the international com- munity on these violent acts. "The escalating terrorist attacks in Jerusalem and other areas are of grave concern and must be put to an end. Israel must do every- thing possible to protect its citizens and restore peaceful conditions," said Conference of Presidents leaders Robert Sugarman, Chairman, and Malcolm Hoenlein, Executive Vice Chairman/CEO in a joint statement. Strong words that need to be said and heard, but it seems they are falling on deaf international ears. It isn't only these groups voicing outrage. The people of Israel--the terrorists' tar- gets--are beginning to say enough is enough. On Nov. 10 Israel Defense Forces Staff Sgt. Almog Shiloni was stabbed multiple times in Tel Aviv while re- turning to his military base. Shiloni eventually died of his wounds. He was 20 years old. "To the government, we say: 'wake up!'" Israel's Maariv reported his twin brother, Sahar, saying. "Your soldiers are defend- ing the country, and see what's going on here? My family is all soldiers--we can't watch the blood that is being spilled here. What is happening in this country is catastrophic; terrifying," Sahar said in his grief. A crowd of furious pedestri- ans in Tel Aviv heckled Interior Security Minister Yitzhak Aharonovitch, as he arrived at the scene of the attack a short time later for a police briefing. "Our blood is not cheap," angry residents shouted at Aharonovitch. "The leftists are respon- sible for all this. They're the ones shedding our blood; our blood is not cheap," one man shouted at the minister, who did not respond, according to Israel's Channel 2 News. Hours earlier, 26-year-old Israeli Dahlia Lemkus was fatally stabbed and two more were injured in Alon Shvut, an Israeli settlement located southwest of Jerusalem, one kilometer northeast of Kfar Etzion. The attack was al- legedly carried out by Maher Hamdi A-Shalmon, who was jailed from 2000 to 2005 for throwing firebombs at Israeli troops. These attacks come on the heels of two car-based terror attacks at Jerusalem light-rail stations in which many were injured and killed, including a 3-month-oldAmerican child named Chaya Zissel Braun. Economy Minister, Naftali Bennett said in comment, "It is not possible to barricade people in the streets, but rather we must put those responsible for incitement, fireworks and the rioters in jail. This is correct security policy," said Bennett, who opposed the emplacement of large concrete blocks at bus and train stations in Jerusa- lem in the wake of the two vehicular ramming attacks. Also on Nov. 10, unknown vandals scrawled graffiti read- ing "Death to Jews" alongside a swastika on an exterior wall of the Salesian Church of Jesus the Adolescent in Nazareth. To make matters worse, instead of condemning these attacks, Mahmoud Abbas made references to ignite a religious war, and urged blocking Jews from entering the Temple Mount 'by all means necessary.' "The PalestinianAuthority must immediately take steps to restore order. Mahmoud Abbas and other Palestinian -officials must end their incite- ful :omments. His reference denying any Jewish connec- tion to its holiest site only serves to raise tensions and encourage further violence. These attacks should instead be condemned by Mr. Abbas and the Palestinian leader- ship, international commu- nity and the United Nations," said Sugarman and Hoenlein. Despite the rash of terror attacks, the international community--and the United Nations in particular--has said nothing. "Every day Israelis are coming under attack. Every day the crowds of violent Pal- estinian rioters grow larger," Israeli Ambassador to the U.N. Ron Prosor told reporters at the United Nations on Nov. 10. "And yet, this institu- tion has not uttered a word to denounce attacl(s against Israelis. Ignoring incitement and terrorism is similar to supporting terrorism." Prosor is absolutely correct in his assessment. The United Nations' silence is a continu- ation of the double-standard with which it treats Israel. If attacks such as these occurred in any other country with the regularity that they have occurred iMsrael, the United Nations and countries around the globe would issue con- demnations and offer support. With the increased focus on terrorism by the international community--especially in theMiddle East--the lack of any reaction from the world body or its member states is conspicuous and wrong. Finance Minister Yair La- pid, in comment, called on the public to exercise restraint in the face of the terror wave. "We standwith our security forces and we call upon all of Israel's citizens to let the IDF, Shin Bet and police force do their jobs," he said at the open- ing ofa Yesh Arid Party faction session, according to his office. Lapid cautioned that"There is no place for calls for revenge in a country which values life just as there is no place for chants of 'Death to the Arabs.' Instead of strengthen- s. ing us,at this difficult time, -it weakens us." So, while the people of Israel will be vigilant to not call for revenge, and continue to value life as they always have, B'nai B'rith International will continue to draw attention to terrorist attacks such as the ones seen recently. The con- stant threats faced by Israel and Israelis from terrorist organizations and their fol- lowers must not be ignored. Perhaps eventually deaf ears will hear. This article was compiled by Christine DeSouza. Dry Bones Voyeurism is a form of sexual assault • By Deborah Rosenbloom WASHINGTON (JTA)-- With all the conversations surrounding the allegations against my congregation's for- mer rabbi, Barry Freundel, no one is saying what desperately needs to be said--that voyeur- ism is sexual assault and that eliminating sexual assault in our communities should be the direction of our next steps. In emails, blogs and ar- ticles, the reaction to allega- tions that Freundel installed hidden cameras in order to view women in the mikveh has focused repeatedly on the specific location of the crime, the importance of making mikvehs safer and the abuse of rabbinic authority. But de- ciding to change who controls the mikveh is a narrow per- spective on the wider issue of • violence against women, and addressing this as an isolated incident would be a mistake. Although considering policies to make our religious spaces safer is certainly worthwhile, it is important that we recog- nize voyeurism as a form of sexual assault, with its own place on the spectrum of violence against women. Sexual assault is often thought to be synonymous with rape. But according to the National Institute of Justice, sexual assault encompasses a range of unwanted sexual behaviors, including voyeur- ism. Whether the perpetrator is peeping through a window, hidingvideo cameras in locker rooms, posting illegally ob- tained intimate photographs or forwarding explicit private photographs intended for one viewer only, he is committing• sexual assault. The true nature of the crime is masked by the use of the word "voyeurism," which makes it seem as if there were no victim. This is an issue of substance and not merely semantics. Think about it. When a robbery occurs, there is a victim--someone is robbed. When a murder occurs, some- one is killed. But voyeurism? Someone is "voyeured"? It's as if there is no victim, only a perpetrator. The victim is the object--the thing that is watched. But women are not objects. This is not a victimless crime. And that's the point. Women know, whether con- sciously or not, that voyeur- ism is part of the continuum of violence against women, a continuum with catcalling on the less severe end and violent rape on the most se- vere end. Hypersexualization and objectification of women devalues women. When we see women as objects--when we dehumanize women--we enable violence. With this understanding, our response to a high school student who forwards explicit pictures of his girlfriend to Rosenbloom on page 15A FightAntisemitism go to: igg.me/at/drybones