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PAGE 4A HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 2014 Can the political left tackle anti-Semitism? By Ben Cohen JNS.org While I've never been a big fan of celebrity interventions in politics, I will concede that, on occasion, a big-screen actor or a rock star will achieve the kind of impact that mere mortals can only dream about. Case in point: Maureen Lipman, a much- loved British Jewish actress whom American audiences will recognize from her role in Ro- man Polanski's 2002 film about the Holocaust, "The Pianist," in which she played the mother of the film's main protagonist, Wladyslaw Szpilman. Last week, Lipman wrote an article fo: Standpoint, a British political magazine, titled "Labour has Lost Me." (She's referring to the current opposition party in a country where they spell 'labor' with a 'u.') In that piece, she did two things. First, she relayed one of the best Jewish jokes I've encountered in a long time, about a rabbi so overcome with the desire to try a steamed pig's head that he ventures in secret to a distant restaurant famed for this dish, only to have a congregant walk in on him as he's poised for his first bite. The rabbi exclaims, "Can you believe this farshtinkener place? You ask for an apple and this is how they serve it!" P.A. cartoon echoes Nazi newspaper's themes By Rafael Medoff JNS.org A leering, hook-nosed Jew, beginning to disrobe, prepares to pounce upon a helpless non-Jewish woman who cowers in fear on the ground before him.This disturbing image, so common in anti-Semitic propaganda in past centuries, this week made an appearance with a modern twist: the hook-nosed would-be rapist wore an Israeli army uniform, and his intended victim, a weeping Muslim woman, wore a headdress indicating that she represented the AI-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem. The cartoon, titled"A1-Aqsa is Being Raped," would be outrageous even if it were the handiwork of some anonymous street corner scribbler. But it is a far more serious matter when it appears--as this one does--on the official website of the Palestinian Authority's National Security Forces, according to a report by Palestinian Media Watch. The stereotype of the Jew as sexual defiler reaches all the way back to medieval times. The 13th-century ruler Alfonso X, of Castile, • decreed capital punishment for any Jew who, "in great insolence and boldness," had intimate relations with a Christian woman. With the invention of modern printing techniques and the advent of political cartooning in the late 18th century, sexually themed anti-Semitic cartoons began to appear. In"Solomon Enjoys Himself with Two Pretty Christian Girls," the 18th-century English caricaturist Thomas Rowlandson drew a beak-nosed Jew grasping bags of money while cavorting with two topless young women. "Moses in the Bullrushes," by the English cartoonist G. M. Woodward in 1799, portrayed a swarthy-looking Jew ravishing a woman in a thicket of tall reeds. A four-panel cartoon by the turn-of-the-century French cartoonist Henry Gerbault depicted an obese, sweaty Jew patronizing a non-Jewish prostitute and then shortchanging her on the payment. Similar themes surfaced in the writings of the early German advocates of racial anti- Semitism, who helped pave the way for the rise of Nazism. Theodor Fritsch's "Antisemiten- Katechismus," first published in 1887, argued that Jews, because of their biological nature, caused "moral devastation" among young German women. • "The Jews' low sensuous disposition and their lack of decency make them the most unscrupulous seducers," Fritsch wrote. His fabricated quotes from the Talmud, allegedly authorizing Jews to sexually assault any gentile girl over the age of three, impressed readers who would never have seen or understood an actual page of Talmud. Fritsch's book went through numerous printings, selling some 75,000 copies by 1930. In his book"Mein Kampf," AdolfHitler wrote of "the black-haired Jew boy, diabolic joy in his face, [who] waits in ambush for the unsus- pecting [German[ girl whom he defiles with his blood and thus robs her from her people." Not surprisingly, anti-Jewish sexual themes became a staple of the notorious Nazi news- paper Der Sturmer, edited by Julius Streicher. Allegations of Jews sexually assaulting German women frequently became headline news, boosting circulation through a salacious combination ofantisemitism and sexual topics that were otherwise taboo. The Jewish attacks were not individual crimes but rather part of an international Jewish conspiracy to "racially defile" Aryan womanhood, according to Streicher. Sexual contact with a Jew permanently "poisoned" a German woman's blood. "Racial defilement forces itself into the body," until the woman's body "gradually loses its own characteristics" and "the alien spirit" gains control of her, he wrote. Eventually, the defiled German woman turns into a kind of de-facto Jew. Der Sturmer staff cartoonist Philipp Rupprecht, who signed his cartoons "Fips," supplied a steady stream of sexually themed anti-Semitic caricatures.Ahuge, leering spider with a Jewish face reaches out to ensnare an innocent German maiden. A swarthy Jew- ish doctor menacingly approaches a sedated female German patient in her underclothing. A Jewish assailant lurks behind a German girl, his thoughts revealed to the reader: alcohol, dancing, sex. At first glance, the Palestinian Authority's cartoon of the Israeli soldier preparing to rape a Muslim woman might seem to be cut from a different cloth• Here the woman symbolizes a mosque, and the cartoon appears at a time of genuine turmoil in Jerusalem. But the essence of the cartoon is all too similar to that of its historical predecessors, appealing to its read- ers' basest instincts by preying on primal fears about outsiders despoiling "their" women. One should always be careful about com- paring contemporary individuals or events to those of the Nazi era. Hitler analogies have been overused by pundits and often produce more heat than light. Sometimes, however, the line dividing legitimate commentary from crude hate-mongering is crossed, and alook back at phenomena of earlier times can be sadly enlightening. Dr. Rafael Medoff is director of The David S. Wyman Institute for Holocaust Studies, in Washington, DC. He is coauthor of the forthcoming book "Cartoonists Against the Holocaust." THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS PAGE ARE NOT NECESSARILY THE VIEWS OF HERITAGE MANAGEMENT.   CENTRAL FLORIDA'SINDEPENDENTJEWISHVOICE   ISSN 0199-0721 Winner of 43 Press Awards Editor/Publisher Jeffrey Gaeser Editor Emeritus Associate Editor Assistant Editor Gene Stare Kim Fischer Christine DeSouza HERITAGE Florida Jewish News (ISN 0199-0721) is published weekly for $37.95 per year to Florida ad- Society Editor Bookkeeping dresses ($46.95 for the rest of the U.S.) by HERITAGE Gloria Yousha Paulette Alfonso Central Florida Jewish News, Inc., 207 O'Brien Road, Suite 101, Fern Park, FL 32730. Periodicals postage Account Executives paid at Fern Park and additional mailing offices. Loft Apple * Marci Gaeser' POSTMASTER: Send address changes and other correspondence to: HERITAGE, P.O. Box 300742, Contributing Columnists Fern Park, FL 32730. Jim Shipley * Ira Sharkansky David Bornstein * Ed Ziegler MAILING ADDRESS PHONE NUMBER P.O. Box 300742 (407) 834-8787 Production Department Fern Park, FL 32730 FAX (407) 831-0507 David Lehman • Gil Dombrosky emaih news@orlandoheritage.com Joyce Gore i Second, so disillusioned is Lipman with the stance on Israel of current Labour leader Ed Miliband, who is also Jewish, that she will not, she wrote, vote for the Labour Party "for the first time in five generations." "Just when the virulence against a country defending itself, against 4,000 rockets and 32 tunnels inside its borders, as it has every right to do under the Geneva Convention, had been swept aside by the real pestilence of the Islamic State, in steps Mr. Miliband to demand that the government recognize the state of Palestine alongside the state of Israel," Lipman thun- dered. She then told Miliband that his "timing sucked," as he had turned on Israel when there were so many more pressing problems in the world, from the genocidal Islamist rampage to the machinations of Russian President Vladimir Putin. In her final flourish, Lipman declared that she'd only vote Labour once the party was again led by "mensches." (Oh yes, the pig joke--that followed an anecdote about Miliband eating a bacon sand- wich shortly after meeting Lipman at a party in London, where he asked whether he might join her for a Shabbat dinner.) Clearly stung by the mauling he received from Lipman, Miliband has now demanded a "zero tolerance" approach to anti-Semitism, citing the vile anti-Semitic attacks on social media upon his parliamentary colleagues Luciana Berger and Louise Ellman as an im- mediate cause. He also decried the "violent assaults, the desecration and damage of Jew- ish property, anti-Semitic graffiti, hate-mail, and online abuse," and revealed that some Jewish parents have told him they are scared for their children. All in all, it seems to have been much more personal for Miliband than for Prime Minister David Cameron, who issued an equally strong statement against anti-Semitism at the end of a summer stained by anti-Jewish violence. "I am deeply concerned by growing reports of anti-Semitism on our streets in Britain," Cameron said. "Let me be clear, we must not tolerate this in our country. There can never be any excuse for anti-Semitism, and no disagreements on politics or policy should ever be allowed to justify racism, prejudice or extremism in any form." Beyond the specific personalities in this particular situation, the knotty question here for the left--whether in the U.K., in America, in Europe, in South Africa, or elsewhere--is whether it can adequately address the issue of anti-Semitism without also examining how the obsession with the Palestinian cause among progressives has contributed to its growth. Certainly, Britain's Labour Party is a per- tinent example of how much the "Palestine" issue dominates discussion of wider foreign policy considerations. In his excellent book, "Blair, Labour and Palestine," the British academic Toby Greene notes former Labour leader Tony Blair's "refusal to criticize Is- Cohen on page 15A Letter from Israel We are in the headlines again By Ira Sharkansky Every day there are violent demonstrations on the borders of several Arab neighborhoods. "Violence" means stones, fireworks, and fire- bombs thrown at the ranks of Border Police, who respond with tear gas, stun grenades, rubber bullets and real bullets on occasion. There have been Palestinian casualties and minor to moderate injuries among the police. A Border Police officer was killed in one of the two incidents of Palestinians driving into pedestrians. The drivers died in a local version of suicide by cop. Palestinians say that the upsurge is the re- sult of Israeli threats against A1 Aqsa Mosque, which is one of the sites throughout the Middle East that competes for the title of the third most holy place in Islam. Some say it is a rebellion of young men from lower income neighborhoods who see no future in Israeli domination and discrimination. The Palestinian leadership has called for the onset of a holy war to stop the threat against Islam, and the Jordanian government has asked the UN Security Council to condemn Israeli incursions against Islam's holy place. The Hashemite fami!y has a historic claim to being the guardians of Islamic holy sites in Jerusalem, and the king's government may be acting largely to keep quiet among its own restive population• As much as 70 percent of the Jordanian population is Palestinian. An unknown number are inclined to extremism, ISIS is just over the borders in Syria and Iraq, Jordan is cooperating with the Americans, and worried that it might become the next battleground• In all of this, a few Jews, including Knesset Members of Likud and Jewish Home, walk demonstrably on the Temple Mount and demand the right to pray or to construct the Third Temple. They are all that is necessary to provide Palestinians and Jordanians reason to proclaim what may enhance their own survival. Turkish President Erdogan is never far from the stage, joining the clamor to censure or sanction Israel for its "ungodly" actions. Israelis are quarreling as to whether the Third Intifada has actually begun, or if the incidents mostly in Jerusalem are the more limited actions of individuals and youth gangs acting on their own, with incitement coming from Hamas and other extremists• A Palestinian who drove into a cluster of soldiers near Gush Etzion was initially de- scribed as another terrorist, but subsequent reports say that it may have been an accident that became a case of hit and run. The driver turned himself in after a few hours. He claims, with some credibility, that if he had stopped at the scene the soldiers would have killed him. With all that is threatening, it is appropriate to weigh several contrary indications. Surveys indicate that moe East Jerusalem Arabs prefer to stay with Israel than to join Palestine. There is a movement, especially among middle- and upper-income Palestinians, to send their chil- dren to Israeli schools in order to qualify for Israeli universities and integration into the better parts of the Israeli economy. Reports are that more East Jerusalemites are applying for Israeli citizenship. Most residents of East Jerusalem may oppose those demonstrating, even while most of those wanting quiet are reluctant to speak out. Even though Mahmoud Abbas is beating the drums on his way to the UN and in behalf of a holy war, his security personnel continue to cooperate with their Israeli counterparts. So far they have acted against any start of an uprising outside of Jerusalem. Fatah-Hamas conflict is somewhere in the explanation, with the Fatah leadership more inclined to going along with Israel, even while its rhetoric competes with that of Hamas. The political equivalent of the Jerusalem syndrome are the Muslims who incite war in defense of al Aqsa, and Jews who puff them- selves up on the Temple Mount during a time of high tension. "It's all mine" is a folly of both Jews and Muslims. Benyamin Netanyahu, Moshe Ya'alon, and Avigdor Liberman, none of whom can be ac- cused of timidity in regard to speaking about the rights of Jews, have sought to quiet their colleagues by urging the wisdom of good timing. Stay off the Temple Mount, and stop talking about it is their message. They also emphasize Israel's concessions to Jordan as a protector of Islamic holy places, and Jordan's importance to the geopolitics of Israel. One can ask if Israel's insistence on main- taining a united Jerusalem under its control is also a kind of Jerusalem syndrome, with emotion getting in the way of rationality. Or if united Jerusalem is a bargaining chip that may be put on the table if the Palestinians show flexibility on other issues. What can be done? Realism gets in the way of concrete solu- tions. There are many already on the table, but those who would qualify for a seat at the table are not interested. And we have learned to sleep through explosions. Ira Sharkansky is a professor (Emeritus) of the Department of Political Science, Hebrew University of Jerusalem. PAGE 4A HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 2014 Can the political left tackle anti-Semitism? By Ben Cohen JNS.org While I've never been a big fan of celebrity interventions in politics, I will concede that, on occasion, a big-screen actor or a rock star will achieve the kind of impact that mere mortals can only dream about. Case in point: Maureen Lipman, a much- loved British Jewish actress whom American audiences will recognize from her role in Ro- man Polanski's 2002 film about the Holocaust, "The Pianist," in which she played the mother of the film's main protagonist, Wladyslaw Szpilman. Last week, Lipman wrote an article fo: Standpoint, a British political magazine, titled "Labour has Lost Me." (She's referring to the current opposition party in a country where they spell 'labor' with a 'u.') In that piece, she did two things. First, she relayed one of the best Jewish jokes I've encountered in a long time, about a rabbi so overcome with the desire to try a steamed pig's head that he ventures in secret to a distant restaurant famed for this dish, only to have a congregant walk in on him as he's poised for his first bite. The rabbi exclaims, "Can you believe this farshtinkener place? You ask for an apple and this is how they serve it!" P.A. cartoon echoes Nazi newspaper's themes By Rafael Medoff JNS.org A leering, hook-nosed Jew, beginning to disrobe, prepares to pounce upon a helpless non-Jewish woman who cowers in fear on the ground before him.This disturbing image, so common in anti-Semitic propaganda in past centuries, this week made an appearance with a modern twist: the hook-nosed would-be rapist wore an Israeli army uniform, and his intended victim, a weeping Muslim woman, wore a headdress indicating that she represented the AI-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem. The cartoon, titled"A1-Aqsa is Being Raped," would be outrageous even if it were the handiwork of some anonymous street corner scribbler. But it is a far more serious matter when it appears--as this one does--on the official website of the Palestinian Authority's National Security Forces, according to a report by Palestinian Media Watch. The stereotype of the Jew as sexual defiler reaches all the way back to medieval times. The 13th-century ruler Alfonso X, of Castile, • decreed capital punishment for any Jew who, "in great insolence and boldness," had intimate relations with a Christian woman. With the invention of modern printing techniques and the advent of political cartooning in the late 18th century, sexually themed anti-Semitic cartoons began to appear. In"Solomon Enjoys Himself with Two Pretty Christian Girls," the 18th-century English caricaturist Thomas Rowlandson drew a beak-nosed Jew grasping bags of money while cavorting with two topless young women. "Moses in the Bullrushes," by the English cartoonist G. M. Woodward in 1799, portrayed a swarthy-looking Jew ravishing a woman in a thicket of tall reeds. A four-panel cartoon by the turn-of-the-century French cartoonist Henry Gerbault depicted an obese, sweaty Jew patronizing a non-Jewish prostitute and then shortchanging her on the payment. Similar themes surfaced in the writings of the early German advocates of racial anti- Semitism, who helped pave the way for the rise of Nazism. Theodor Fritsch's "Antisemiten- Katechismus," first published in 1887, argued that Jews, because of their biological nature, caused "moral devastation" among young German women. • "The Jews' low sensuous disposition and their lack of decency make them the most unscrupulous seducers," Fritsch wrote. His fabricated quotes from the Talmud, allegedly authorizing Jews to sexually assault any gentile girl over the age of three, impressed readers who would never have seen or understood an actual page of Talmud. Fritsch's book went through numerous printings, selling some 75,000 copies by 1930. In his book"Mein Kampf," AdolfHitler wrote of "the black-haired Jew boy, diabolic joy in his face, [who] waits in ambush for the unsus- pecting [German[ girl whom he defiles with his blood and thus robs her from her people." Not surprisingly, anti-Jewish sexual themes became a staple of the notorious Nazi news- paper Der Sturmer, edited by Julius Streicher. Allegations of Jews sexually assaulting German women frequently became headline news, boosting circulation through a salacious combination ofantisemitism and sexual topics that were otherwise taboo. The Jewish attacks were not individual crimes but rather part of an international Jewish conspiracy to "racially defile" Aryan womanhood, according to Streicher. Sexual contact with a Jew permanently "poisoned" a German woman's blood. "Racial defilement forces itself into the body," until the woman's body "gradually loses its own characteristics" and "the alien spirit" gains control of her, he wrote. Eventually, the defiled German woman turns into a kind of de-facto Jew. Der Sturmer staff cartoonist Philipp Rupprecht, who signed his cartoons "Fips," supplied a steady stream of sexually themed anti-Semitic caricatures.Ahuge, leering spider with a Jewish face reaches out to ensnare an innocent German maiden. A swarthy Jew- ish doctor menacingly approaches a sedated female German patient in her underclothing. A Jewish assailant lurks behind a German girl, his thoughts revealed to the reader: alcohol, dancing, sex. At first glance, the Palestinian Authority's cartoon of the Israeli soldier preparing to rape a Muslim woman might seem to be cut from a different cloth• Here the woman symbolizes a mosque, and the cartoon appears at a time of genuine turmoil in Jerusalem. But the essence of the cartoon is all too similar to that of its historical predecessors, appealing to its read- ers' basest instincts by preying on primal fears about outsiders despoiling "their" women. One should always be careful about com- paring contemporary individuals or events to those of the Nazi era. Hitler analogies have been overused by pundits and often produce more heat than light. Sometimes, however, the line dividing legitimate commentary from crude hate-mongering is crossed, and alook back at phenomena of earlier times can be sadly enlightening. Dr. Rafael Medoff is director of The David S. Wyman Institute for Holocaust Studies, in Washington, DC. He is coauthor of the forthcoming book "Cartoonists Against the Holocaust." THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS PAGE ARE NOT NECESSARILY THE VIEWS OF HERITAGE MANAGEMENT.   CENTRAL FLORIDA'SINDEPENDENTJEWISHVOICE   ISSN 0199-0721 Winner of 43 Press Awards Editor/Publisher Jeffrey Gaeser Editor Emeritus Associate Editor Assistant Editor Gene Stare Kim Fischer Christine DeSouza HERITAGE Florida Jewish News (ISN 0199-0721) is published weekly for $37.95 per year to Florida ad- Society Editor Bookkeeping dresses ($46.95 for the rest of the U.S.) by HERITAGE Gloria Yousha Paulette Alfonso Central Florida Jewish News, Inc., 207 O'Brien Road, Suite 101, Fern Park, FL 32730. Periodicals postage Account Executives paid at Fern Park and additional mailing offices. Loft Apple * Marci Gaeser' POSTMASTER: Send address changes and other correspondence to: HERITAGE, P.O. Box 300742, Contributing Columnists Fern Park, FL 32730. Jim Shipley * Ira Sharkansky David Bornstein * Ed Ziegler MAILING ADDRESS PHONE NUMBER P.O. Box 300742 (407) 834-8787 Production Department Fern Park, FL 32730 FAX (407) 831-0507 David Lehman • Gil Dombrosky emaih news@orlandoheritage.com Joyce Gore i Second, so disillusioned is Lipman with the stance on Israel of current Labour leader Ed Miliband, who is also Jewish, that she will not, she wrote, vote for the Labour Party "for the first time in five generations." "Just when the virulence against a country defending itself, against 4,000 rockets and 32 tunnels inside its borders, as it has every right to do under the Geneva Convention, had been swept aside by the real pestilence of the Islamic State, in steps Mr. Miliband to demand that the government recognize the state of Palestine alongside the state of Israel," Lipman thun- dered. She then told Miliband that his "timing sucked," as he had turned on Israel when there were so many more pressing problems in the world, from the genocidal Islamist rampage to the machinations of Russian President Vladimir Putin. In her final flourish, Lipman declared that she'd only vote Labour once the party was again led by "mensches." (Oh yes, the pig joke--that followed an anecdote about Miliband eating a bacon sand- wich shortly after meeting Lipman at a party in London, where he asked whether he might join her for a Shabbat dinner.) Clearly stung by the mauling he received from Lipman, Miliband has now demanded a "zero tolerance" approach to anti-Semitism, citing the vile anti-Semitic attacks on social media upon his parliamentary colleagues Luciana Berger and Louise Ellman as an im- mediate cause. He also decried the "violent assaults, the desecration and damage of Jew- ish property, anti-Semitic graffiti, hate-mail, and online abuse," and revealed that some Jewish parents have told him they are scared for their children. All in all, it seems to have been much more personal for Miliband than for Prime Minister David Cameron, who issued an equally strong statement against anti-Semitism at the end of a summer stained by anti-Jewish violence. "I am deeply concerned by growing reports of anti-Semitism on our streets in Britain," Cameron said. "Let me be clear, we must not tolerate this in our country. There can never be any excuse for anti-Semitism, and no disagreements on politics or policy should ever be allowed to justify racism, prejudice or extremism in any form." Beyond the specific personalities in this particular situation, the knotty question here for the left--whether in the U.K., in America, in Europe, in South Africa, or elsewhere--is whether it can adequately address the issue of anti-Semitism without also examining how the obsession with the Palestinian cause among progressives has contributed to its growth. Certainly, Britain's Labour Party is a per- tinent example of how much the "Palestine" issue dominates discussion of wider foreign policy considerations. In his excellent book, "Blair, Labour and Palestine," the British academic Toby Greene notes former Labour leader Tony Blair's "refusal to criticize Is- Cohen on page 15A Letter from Israel We are in the headlines again By Ira Sharkansky Every day there are violent demonstrations on the borders of several Arab neighborhoods. "Violence" means stones, fireworks, and fire- bombs thrown at the ranks of Border Police, who respond with tear gas, stun grenades, rubber bullets and real bullets on occasion. There have been Palestinian casualties and minor to moderate injuries among the police. A Border Police officer was killed in one of the two incidents of Palestinians driving into pedestrians. The drivers died in a local version of suicide by cop. Palestinians say that the upsurge is the re- sult of Israeli threats against A1 Aqsa Mosque, which is one of the sites throughout the Middle East that competes for the title of the third most holy place in Islam. Some say it is a rebellion of young men from lower income neighborhoods who see no future in Israeli domination and discrimination. The Palestinian leadership has called for the onset of a holy war to stop the threat against Islam, and the Jordanian government has asked the UN Security Council to condemn Israeli incursions against Islam's holy place. The Hashemite fami!y has a historic claim to being the guardians of Islamic holy sites in Jerusalem, and the king's government may be acting largely to keep quiet among its own restive population• As much as 70 percent of the Jordanian population is Palestinian. An unknown number are inclined to extremism, ISIS is just over the borders in Syria and Iraq, Jordan is cooperating with the Americans, and worried that it might become the next battleground• In all of this, a few Jews, including Knesset Members of Likud and Jewish Home, walk demonstrably on the Temple Mount and demand the right to pray or to construct the Third Temple. They are all that is necessary to provide Palestinians and Jordanians reason to proclaim what may enhance their own survival. Turkish President Erdogan is never far from the stage, joining the clamor to censure or sanction Israel for its "ungodly" actions. Israelis are quarreling as to whether the Third Intifada has actually begun, or if the incidents mostly in Jerusalem are the more limited actions of individuals and youth gangs acting on their own, with incitement coming from Hamas and other extremists• A Palestinian who drove into a cluster of soldiers near Gush Etzion was initially de- scribed as another terrorist, but subsequent reports say that it may have been an accident that became a case of hit and run. The driver turned himself in after a few hours. He claims, with some credibility, that if he had stopped at the scene the soldiers would have killed him. With all that is threatening, it is appropriate to weigh several contrary indications. Surveys indicate that moe East Jerusalem Arabs prefer to stay with Israel than to join Palestine. There is a movement, especially among middle- and upper-income Palestinians, to send their chil- dren to Israeli schools in order to qualify for Israeli universities and integration into the better parts of the Israeli economy. Reports are that more East Jerusalemites are applying for Israeli citizenship. Most residents of East Jerusalem may oppose those demonstrating, even while most of those wanting quiet are reluctant to speak out. Even though Mahmoud Abbas is beating the drums on his way to the UN and in behalf of a holy war, his security personnel continue to cooperate with their Israeli counterparts. So far they have acted against any start of an uprising outside of Jerusalem. Fatah-Hamas conflict is somewhere in the explanation, with the Fatah leadership more inclined to going along with Israel, even while its rhetoric competes with that of Hamas. The political equivalent of the Jerusalem syndrome are the Muslims who incite war in defense of al Aqsa, and Jews who puff them- selves up on the Temple Mount during a time of high tension. "It's all mine" is a folly of both Jews and Muslims. Benyamin Netanyahu, Moshe Ya'alon, and Avigdor Liberman, none of whom can be ac- cused of timidity in regard to speaking about the rights of Jews, have sought to quiet their colleagues by urging the wisdom of good timing. Stay off the Temple Mount, and stop talking about it is their message. They also emphasize Israel's concessions to Jordan as a protector of Islamic holy places, and Jordan's importance to the geopolitics of Israel. One can ask if Israel's insistence on main- taining a united Jerusalem under its control is also a kind of Jerusalem syndrome, with emotion getting in the way of rationality. Or if united Jerusalem is a bargaining chip that may be put on the table if the Palestinians show flexibility on other issues. What can be done? Realism gets in the way of concrete solu- tions. There are many already on the table, but those who would qualify for a seat at the table are not interested. And we have learned to sleep through explosions. Ira Sharkansky is a professor (Emeritus) of the Department of Political Science, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.