Newspaper Archive of
Heritage Florida Jewish News
Fern Park , Florida
Lyft
May 18, 2012     Heritage Florida Jewish News
PAGE 10     (10 of 22 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 10     (10 of 22 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
May 18, 2012
 

Newspaper Archive of Heritage Florida Jewish News produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




PAGE IOA HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, MAY 18, 2012 Temple Israel offers all-night study session on Shavuot The best of intentions often have unintended consequenc- es. On the eve of receiving the Torah at Mount Sinai, our ancestors were worried they wouldn't be properly rested the next day. They had been hiking through the wilder- ness for seven weeks and had come from brutal bondage in Egypt. That didn't leave them feeling strong enough for the imminent encounter with God. They went for the only solution available, going to bed early to get a good night's sleep. By the time they blearily awoke the next morning, God was already waiting for them atop the mountain. They had overslept. Would they have been more focused if they hadn't woken up late? Would they have avoided the pitfall of the Golden Calf if they had faced morning perhaps a bit more tired but with clearer minds? We will never know, but in the 1500s Rabbi Yosef Karo initiated a custom to help us better prepare spiritually for Shavuot. He and the members of his community would stay up all night studying from Jewish texts. This practice is called Tikkun Leil Shavuot. Of course, they would be tired the next day, but being tired and energized with purpose is better than being rested and unfocnsed. This year there is a rare opportunity to participate in this custom. Shavuot falls on the Saturday night of Memo- rial Day weekend. Unless you are celebrating Shavuot out of town, there is no reason to miss this chance. But what does it mean to study all night? Aren't all- night cram sessions terrible? Wouldn't hours of study be monotonous or deadening? Study is a spiritual act greater than prayer. Engaging with Torah is an act of hear- ing God's word made real and personal. Revelation, which we com- memorate on Shavuot, is the single most important yet overlooked aspect of Judaism. It was God's gracious gift of wisdom and instruction that made us the Jewish people. To spend a sleepless night in appreciation and anticipation of this act, which forever changed the world can provide aspiritual experience without parallel. Temple Israel in Winter Springs is offering this op- portunity. Tikkun Leil Shavuot, May 26 at 8:45 p.m. Ma'ariv service and all-night study session un- til services the next morning. If you're not sure you'll make it all night, please join us for as much as you wish. Sleeping bags welcome. Shavuot Day 1, May 27 from 9 a.m.-11 a.m. Shavuot Day 2, May 28 from 9 a.m.-11 a.m. with Yizkor at 10 a.m. For further information call Temple Israel 407-647- 3055 or visit its website at www.tiflorida.org. Rabbi Joshua Neely of Temple Israel, Winter Springs By Jamie Geiler (JTA)--The mere mention of Shavuot sends images of cheesecakes dancing before my eyes and calling my name. I love cheesecakes and they love me--so much they plant themselves on my hips forever. On the two-day festival, which this year begins on the evening of Hay 26, the Jewish people became the People of the Book. When we said, "yes" to accepting the Torah, we created a bond--like marriage, our sages say--with our Creator that will never be broken. So in honor of my marriage to a man that does not like cheesecake--not really sure what to do about that--and my waistline, I'm forsaking the cheesecake and making his favorite dairy delicacy, pizza, to satisfy the custom of enjoying dairy delights on Shavuot. When I met my hubby-to-be eight years ago, I was a bachelorette on a perpetual diet; my go-to foods were salad, fruit and yogurt. Bachelor food looks more like a slice (or two or three) of pizza daily--could be for breakfast, lunch, dinner or all three. So as a cultured pizza connoisseur, my future spouse introduced me to pizza shops all over New York: the good, the great and the fabulous, complete with running commentary on the specialties of each. I discovered that a New York pizza shop is so much more than just plain pies. It was almost surrealistic to experience--fries and onion rings and fried eggplant on a pizza, even salad. I pretended especially to go for the salad pizza, but I must confess I loved, loved, loved those onion ring pies and all the rest! Plain pizza is so yesterday, I concluded. And since that time, I must have my slice all dressed up, piled with everything, like it's going to the pizza party of the year. Of course, now I make my own. There's no point to standing in line at the pizza place when it's so easy to do it yourself. I have developed some amazing pizzas that are healthy and quick, and one oh-so yummy carb-fest for my other half. You won't find these at your local pizzeria. First up, Onion Lovers Pizza: Eat this with those you love and serve Listerine for dessert. This one takes the prize for color: the red onions give it a real splash, and combined with shallots, Yidalias and chopped chives, it's a sure winner. I've never seen a local pizza shop put potatoes (that aren't fried) or avocado on a pie--so I thought I should be the first. The avocado, as I see it, is one of God's gifts to this world. My goal, before 120, is to try it on every- thing. Hey, I just saw Martha (as in Stewart) put zucchini ribbons on a Bundt cake, so why not throw avocado on a pizza? Heavenly! Try this super summer concoction: Peach and Arugula Pizza. It's not too sweet, as the arugula has a bit of a bite, but it's summer perfection in a pie. My hubby's favorite slice is piled high with Creamy Baked Ziti. Cover your dough with sauce and top it with as much ziti as you can handle. Bake until the crust is golden and the cheese bubbly and browned. Bake any extra ziti in a casserole, as per the recipe instructions. (I must admit, I kinda love that version too!). The idea here is to be so satisfied that you won't even crave the cheesecake for dessert. Maybe I'll bum a slice off my neighbor. Happy Shavuot! ONION LOVERS PIZZA Prep time: 15 minutes Cook time: 15 minutes Ready time: 30 minutes Servings-4 Ingredients: 1 small Vidalia or sweet onion, thinly sliced I cup sliced shallots I tablespoon olive oil I frozen pizza dough, defrosted (9-ounce) Courtesy Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller Jamie GeUer wants to put avocado on eajthing; here she tries it with pizza. 2 to 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1/4 cup ricotta cheese 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 cup diced red onion 1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese 2 tablespoons chopped chives Freshly ground black pepper, to taste Preparation: In a medium saute pan, saute Yidalia onion and shallots in olive oil over medium high heat for 8 to 10 minutes or until softened and beginning to caramelize. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 450 degrees. Sprinkle a rimless baking sheet with I tablespoon flour and set aside. On a lightly floured surface, roll out pizza dough to a 10-inch circle and transfer to prepared baking sheet. Prick dough all over with a fork to help prevent large bubbles from forming during baking. Spread dough evenly with ricotta cheese and sprinkle with salt. Top with sauteed onion mixture, red onion and mozzarella cheese. Bake for 12 to 16 minutes or until crust is golden brown and cheese is bubbly. Garnish with chives and pepper, and slice into6 to 8 wedges to serve. POTATO AND AVOCADO PIZZA Prep time: 15 minutes Cook time: 15 minutes Ready time:30 minutes Servings: 4 Ingredients: 1 medium Yukon gold potato, scrubbed 1 frozen pizza dough, defrosted (9-ounce) 2 to 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 3/4 cup shredded mozzarella cheese 1 green onion, chopped 1/2 medium avocado, peeled, pitted and sliced Preparation: In a small saucepan, cover potato with 1/2-inch wa- ter and bring to a boil. Simmer until just tender when pierced with a fork, about 12 to 14 minutes. Let cool until comfortable to handle. Slice into 1/4-inch thin slices and set aside. While potato is cooking, preheat oven to 450 degrees. Sprinkle a rimless baking sheet with 1 tablespoon flour and set aside. On a lightly floured surface, roll out pizza dough to a 10-inch circle and transfer to prepared baking sheet. Prick dough all over with a fork to help prevent large bubbles from forming during baking. Sprinkle with sliced garlic, olive oil and salt. Layer potato slices all over pizza and top with cheese and green onion. Bake for 12 to 16 minutes or until crust is golden brown and cheese is bubbly. Top with avocado slices once out of the oven. Slice into 6 to 8 wedges and serve immediately. PEACH AND ARUGULA PIZZA Prep time: 10 minutes Cook time: 15 minutes Ready time: 25 minutes Servings: 4 Ingredients: 1 frozen pizza dough, defrosted (9-ounce) 2 to 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons sour cream 1 small yellow peach, pitted and cut into 10 slices 3/4 cup shredded mozzarella cheese 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 cup arugula, washed and dried thoroughly 1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil Preparation: Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Sprinkle a rimless baking sheet with 1 tablespoon flour and set aside. On a lightly floured surface, roll out pizza dough to a 10-inch circle and transfer to prepared baking sheet. Prick dough all over with a fork to help prevent large bubbles from forming during baking. Top with sour cream, peach slices, cheese and pepper. Bake for 12 to 16 minutes or until crust is golden brown and cheese is bubbly. Top with arugula and drizzle with olive oil. Cut into 6 to 8 wedges and serve immediately. CREAMY ZITI This is it, the Geller ziti! Hubby and I are famous in our neighborhood for this yummy dish. It's a quick prep, but it lasts long in people's memories. Prep time: 12 minutes Ready time: 12 minutes Servings: 6-8 Ingredients: 1 (1-pound) box ziti or penne rigate 2 (26-ounce) jars prepared marinara sauce 1 (32-ounce) container ricotta cheese 2 (8-ounce) packages shredded mozzarella cheese, divided Preparation: Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly grease a 9-by-13- inch pan with nonstick cooking spray. Cook ziti about 2 to 3 minutes less than package direc- tions for al dente pasta. Drain, rinse with cold water to stop the cooking and set aside. In a large bowl, mix marinara sauce, ricotta and 1 cup of mozzarella. Pour about 2 cups of the sauce mixture in prepared pan, spreading over bottom. Combine ziti and remaining sauce mixture and stir until well combined, making sure there are no dry patches of pasta. Pour into pan and spread to edges. Sprinkle remaining mozzarella over ziti to cover. Spray a sheet of aluminum foil with cooking spray and cover ziti. This will keep the cheese from sticking to the foil. Bake, covered, at 375 degrees for 45 minutes to I hour. Uncover and continue baking until cheese is golden brown and bubbly. Serve hot, straight out of the pan. Tip: One secret to this ziti is that the pasta is slightly undercooked before it goes into the oven, which helps prevent it from becoming too mushy. Jamie Geller is the author of the best-selling "Quick & Kosher" cookbook series and creator of the Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller magazine. She is the host of the popular "Quick & Kosher" cooking show online at youtube.com/joyofkosher and on-air on JLTV. Fol- low more of Geller's Quick  Kosher cooking adven- tures on Twitter @JoyofKosher and on facebook.com/ joyofkosher.) Pie-in-the-sky thinking: Putting pizzazz into pizza