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.J  PAGE 20A HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, JANUARY 4, 2013 In New Y()rk, Lost Tribes beer company resurrects ancient brews Lost Tribes Brew The five co-founders of New York's Lost Tribes Brew, from left: David Itzkowitz, Rabbi Harry Rozenberg, Allan Farago, Ari Smith and Andrew Septimus. By Chavie Lieber NEW YORK (JTA)--As he weaves in and out of traffic in New York City on a Friday afternoon, David Itzkowitz has two things on his mind: Shabbat and beer. Beer because Itzkowitz, 26, is a co-founder of Lost Tribes, a beverage company that makes microbrews de- rived from ancient recipes held dear by Jewish cultures from exotic parts of the world. And Shabbat because Itzkowitz, an observant Jew, still has a few deliveries left to make before sundown. "It's all about the pale ale," Itzkowitz tells JTA by phone on his way to a delivery in the Bronx. "You need a balance of the perfect amount of hop with a little malt. It needs to tickle your taste buds and have a little buzz, too." The idea behind Lost Tribes, which is less than a year old, was born in 2009 when three of the company's five founders ventured to Israel to learn more about the country's budding mi- crobrewery industry and come up with ideas for their own beer. They spent a lot of time with Jews that some say hail from the 10 lost tribes of Israel--Ethiopian Jews, said by some to be descendants of the Tribe of Dan, and Indian Jews, said by some to be from the Tribe of Menashe. "We were exploring, look- ing to find new recipes, and Jews from all these interest- ing places kept approaching us about their family recipes," Itzkowitz said. "They were worried that these ancient recipes,whicharethousands of years old, would be lost, since nobody was selling them on a commercial scale and their kids didn't know them." The three collected recipes, took notes and, upon t heir re- turnstateside, beganworking with a brewmaster to test the recipes and develop the beers for commercial sale. By early this year the group--Itzkowitz, Allan Farago, Ari Smith, Andrew Septimus and Rabbi Harry Rozenberg, five Jewish child- hood friends all under age 31--began selling the beer commercially. Lost Tribes now sells to 75 locations in New York, mostly bars and supermarkets but also by special delivery. The company hopes to go national in the coming months. According to the com- pany's website, "2,700 years ago, 10 of the 12 tribes were sent into exile, eventually settling across Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia. Legend has it that one day the tribes will return home bearing gifts from their lands. We've discovered that each tribe holds a unique brew recipe--we believe that their brews were the gifts they were meant to bring home." Lost Tribes sells three beer lines: a pale ale they call Shikra, an Aramaic word for alcoholic beverage; Tej, an Ethiopian-adapted recipe of honey and herbs that is ko- sher for Passover; and a low- calorie option called Light. The beers are made in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York, and the company's warehouse is in Queens. The company says it donates a fixed amount of profits to Israeli groups that work with Jews from the ethnic minorities said to be from the lost tribes. One of the company's next projects--aside from devel- oping more craft brews--is to launch a social media website called iTribe, where people from around the world can digitally connect and learn about ancient traditions by sharing photos, literature and recipes. After Lost Tribe's website went live in 2011, people from around the world wrote in claiming to be part of a lost tribe and offering up their own family recipes, the founders said. "We gotan email last week from someone in Japan who said he was part of a lost tribe and has an incredible Japa- nese whiskey recipe for us," Itzkowitz said. "We've also heard from Lemba, people from South Africa with a Jewish claim, who have their own brew recipe." Rozenberg adds, "We're hoping to get to a point where we have an entire set of these ancient beer options." It's not surprising that so many of these cultures have their own beer recipe, Rozen- berg said. After all, nearly every culture has its own alcoholic traditions, though carbonated beer of the sort imbibed today did not emerge until the 16th or 17th century. Even the Talmud speaks of beer, Rozenberg notes, pointing to a passage in Trac- tate Pesachim in which Rav Papa, a famous sage, makes beer from dates. "We adapted our Shikra line of beer after him--it's a pale \\; \\; BUYER 941 Fairbanks Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 Lost Tribes Brew Lost Tribes makes and packages its product at its brewery in upstate New York. ale made with organic dates from Israel," Itzkowitz said. Lost Tribes is in the process of developing several new beverages, including Zut- ing, a rice and yeast-based wine; Chibuku, a heavy beer of Zimbabwean origins; and their own version of sake. Farago, the inhouse beer connoisseur, attributes much of the company's success to New York's downtown tech scene, Silicon Alley, where the brewer has partnered to do corporate parties with companies such as Vimeo, Buzzfeed and College Hu- mor. Lost Tribes also runs Tumblr's monthly beer-pong tournaments. Forbes maga- zine listed Lost Tribes as one of the new cool beers to try. "The response has been so great, and the reorder requests from the bars have been overwhelming," Farago said. "People love our back- story. It's great to see how many people care about our attempts to resurrect ancient brews." .J  PAGE 20A HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, JANUARY 4, 2013 In New Y()rk, Lost Tribes beer company resurrects ancient brews Lost Tribes Brew The five co-founders of New York's Lost Tribes Brew, from left: David Itzkowitz, Rabbi Harry Rozenberg, Allan Farago, Ari Smith and Andrew Septimus. By Chavie Lieber NEW YORK (JTA)--As he weaves in and out of traffic in New York City on a Friday afternoon, David Itzkowitz has two things on his mind: Shabbat and beer. Beer because Itzkowitz, 26, is a co-founder of Lost Tribes, a beverage company that makes microbrews de- rived from ancient recipes held dear by Jewish cultures from exotic parts of the world. And Shabbat because Itzkowitz, an observant Jew, still has a few deliveries left to make before sundown. "It's all about the pale ale," Itzkowitz tells JTA by phone on his way to a delivery in the Bronx. "You need a balance of the perfect amount of hop with a little malt. It needs to tickle your taste buds and have a little buzz, too." The idea behind Lost Tribes, which is less than a year old, was born in 2009 when three of the company's five founders ventured to Israel to learn more about the country's budding mi- crobrewery industry and come up with ideas for their own beer. They spent a lot of time with Jews that some say hail from the 10 lost tribes of Israel--Ethiopian Jews, said by some to be descendants of the Tribe of Dan, and Indian Jews, said by some to be from the Tribe of Menashe. "We were exploring, look- ing to find new recipes, and Jews from all these interest- ing places kept approaching us about their family recipes," Itzkowitz said. "They were worried that these ancient recipes,whicharethousands of years old, would be lost, since nobody was selling them on a commercial scale and their kids didn't know them." The three collected recipes, took notes and, upon t heir re- turnstateside, beganworking with a brewmaster to test the recipes and develop the beers for commercial sale. By early this year the group--Itzkowitz, Allan Farago, Ari Smith, Andrew Septimus and Rabbi Harry Rozenberg, five Jewish child- hood friends all under age 31--began selling the beer commercially. Lost Tribes now sells to 75 locations in New York, mostly bars and supermarkets but also by special delivery. The company hopes to go national in the coming months. According to the com- pany's website, "2,700 years ago, 10 of the 12 tribes were sent into exile, eventually settling across Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia. Legend has it that one day the tribes will return home bearing gifts from their lands. We've discovered that each tribe holds a unique brew recipe--we believe that their brews were the gifts they were meant to bring home." Lost Tribes sells three beer lines: a pale ale they call Shikra, an Aramaic word for alcoholic beverage; Tej, an Ethiopian-adapted recipe of honey and herbs that is ko- sher for Passover; and a low- calorie option called Light. The beers are made in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York, and the company's warehouse is in Queens. The company says it donates a fixed amount of profits to Israeli groups that work with Jews from the ethnic minorities said to be from the lost tribes. One of the company's next projects--aside from devel- oping more craft brews--is to launch a social media website called iTribe, where people from around the world can digitally connect and learn about ancient traditions by sharing photos, literature and recipes. After Lost Tribe's website went live in 2011, people from around the world wrote in claiming to be part of a lost tribe and offering up their own family recipes, the founders said. "We gotan email last week from someone in Japan who said he was part of a lost tribe and has an incredible Japa- nese whiskey recipe for us," Itzkowitz said. "We've also heard from Lemba, people from South Africa with a Jewish claim, who have their own brew recipe." Rozenberg adds, "We're hoping to get to a point where we have an entire set of these ancient beer options." It's not surprising that so many of these cultures have their own beer recipe, Rozen- berg said. After all, nearly every culture has its own alcoholic traditions, though carbonated beer of the sort imbibed today did not emerge until the 16th or 17th century. Even the Talmud speaks of beer, Rozenberg notes, pointing to a passage in Trac- tate Pesachim in which Rav Papa, a famous sage, makes beer from dates. "We adapted our Shikra line of beer after him--it's a pale \\; \\; BUYER 941 Fairbanks Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 Lost Tribes Brew Lost Tribes makes and packages its product at its brewery in upstate New York. ale made with organic dates from Israel," Itzkowitz said. Lost Tribes is in the process of developing several new beverages, including Zut- ing, a rice and yeast-based wine; Chibuku, a heavy beer of Zimbabwean origins; and their own version of sake. Farago, the inhouse beer connoisseur, attributes much of the company's success to New York's downtown tech scene, Silicon Alley, where the brewer has partnered to do corporate parties with companies such as Vimeo, Buzzfeed and College Hu- mor. Lost Tribes also runs Tumblr's monthly beer-pong tournaments. Forbes maga- zine listed Lost Tribes as one of the new cool beers to try. "The response has been so great, and the reorder requests from the bars have been overwhelming," Farago said. "People love our back- story. It's great to see how many people care about our attempts to resurrect ancient brews." .J  PAGE 20A HERITAGE FLORIDA JEWISH NEWS, JANUARY 4, 2013 In New Y()rk, Lost Tribes beer company resurrects ancient brews Lost Tribes Brew The five co-founders of New York's Lost Tribes Brew, from left: David Itzkowitz, Rabbi Harry Rozenberg, Allan Farago, Ari Smith and Andrew Septimus. By Chavie Lieber NEW YORK (JTA)--As he weaves in and out of traffic in New York City on a Friday afternoon, David Itzkowitz has two things on his mind: Shabbat and beer. Beer because Itzkowitz, 26, is a co-founder of Lost Tribes, a beverage company that makes microbrews de- rived from ancient recipes held dear by Jewish cultures from exotic parts of the world. And Shabbat because Itzkowitz, an observant Jew, still has a few deliveries left to make before sundown. "It's all about the pale ale," Itzkowitz tells JTA by phone on his way to a delivery in the Bronx. "You need a balance of the perfect amount of hop with a little malt. It needs to tickle your taste buds and have a little buzz, too." The idea behind Lost Tribes, which is less than a year old, was born in 2009 when three of the company's five founders ventured to Israel to learn more about the country's budding mi- crobrewery industry and come up with ideas for their own beer. They spent a lot of time with Jews that some say hail from the 10 lost tribes of Israel--Ethiopian Jews, said by some to be descendants of the Tribe of Dan, and Indian Jews, said by some to be from the Tribe of Menashe. "We were exploring, look- ing to find new recipes, and Jews from all these interest- ing places kept approaching us about their family recipes," Itzkowitz said. "They were worried that these ancient recipes,whicharethousands of years old, would be lost, since nobody was selling them on a commercial scale and their kids didn't know them." The three collected recipes, took notes and, upon t heir re- turnstateside, beganworking with a brewmaster to test the recipes and develop the beers for commercial sale. By early this year the group--Itzkowitz, Allan Farago, Ari Smith, Andrew Septimus and Rabbi Harry Rozenberg, five Jewish child- hood friends all under age 31--began selling the beer commercially. Lost Tribes now sells to 75 locations in New York, mostly bars and supermarkets but also by special delivery. The company hopes to go national in the coming months. According to the com- pany's website, "2,700 years ago, 10 of the 12 tribes were sent into exile, eventually settling across Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia. Legend has it that one day the tribes will return home bearing gifts from their lands. We've discovered that each tribe holds a unique brew recipe--we believe that their brews were the gifts they were meant to bring home." Lost Tribes sells three beer lines: a pale ale they call Shikra, an Aramaic word for alcoholic beverage; Tej, an Ethiopian-adapted recipe of honey and herbs that is ko- sher for Passover; and a low- calorie option called Light. The beers are made in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York, and the company's warehouse is in Queens. The company says it donates a fixed amount of profits to Israeli groups that work with Jews from the ethnic minorities said to be from the lost tribes. One of the company's next projects--aside from devel- oping more craft brews--is to launch a social media website called iTribe, where people from around the world can digitally connect and learn about ancient traditions by sharing photos, literature and recipes. After Lost Tribe's website went live in 2011, people from around the world wrote in claiming to be part of a lost tribe and offering up their own family recipes, the founders said. "We gotan email last week from someone in Japan who said he was part of a lost tribe and has an incredible Japa- nese whiskey recipe for us," Itzkowitz said. "We've also heard from Lemba, people from South Africa with a Jewish claim, who have their own brew recipe." Rozenberg adds, "We're hoping to get to a point where we have an entire set of these ancient beer options." It's not surprising that so many of these cultures have their own beer recipe, Rozen- berg said. After all, nearly every culture has its own alcoholic traditions, though carbonated beer of the sort imbibed today did not emerge until the 16th or 17th century. Even the Talmud speaks of beer, Rozenberg notes, pointing to a passage in Trac- tate Pesachim in which Rav Papa, a famous sage, makes beer from dates. "We adapted our Shikra line of beer after him--it's a pale \\; \\; BUYER 941 Fairbanks Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 Lost Tribes Brew Lost Tribes makes and packages its product at its brewery in upstate New York. ale made with organic dates from Israel," Itzkowitz said. Lost Tribes is in the process of developing several new beverages, including Zut- ing, a rice and yeast-based wine; Chibuku, a heavy beer of Zimbabwean origins; and their own version of sake. Farago, the inhouse beer connoisseur, attributes much of the company's success to New York's downtown tech scene, Silicon Alley, where the brewer has partnered to do corporate parties with companies such as Vimeo, Buzzfeed and College Hu- mor. Lost Tribes also runs Tumblr's monthly beer-pong tournaments. Forbes maga- zine listed Lost Tribes as one of the new cool beers to try. "The response has been so great, and the reorder requests from the bars have been overwhelming," Farago said. "People love our back- story. It's great to see how many people care about our attempts to resurrect ancient brews."